EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English *hake, from Old English hæca, haca (hook, bolt, door-fastening, bar), from Proto-Germanic *hakô (hook), from Proto-Indo-European *keg-, *keng- (peg, hook). Cognate with Dutch haak (hook), German Haken (hook), Danish hage (hook), Swedish hake (hook), Icelandic haki (hook), Hittite kagas (tooth), Middle Irish ailchaing (weapons rack), Lithuanian kéngė (hook, latch), Russian коготь (kógot', claw). Related to hook.

NounEdit

hake (plural hakes)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) A hook; a pot-hook.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) A kind of weapon; a pike.
  3. (Now chiefly dialectal) (in the plural) The draught-irons of a plough.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English hake, probably a shortened form (due to Scandinavian influence) of English dialectal haked (pike). Compare Norwegian hakefisk (trout, salmon), Middle Low German haken (kipper). More at haked.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

hake (plural hakes or hake)

  1. One of several species of marine gadoid fishes, of the genera Phycis, Merluccius, and allies.
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

NounEdit

hake (plural hakes)

  1. A drying shed, as for unburned tile.
    • 1882, P. L. Sword & Son, Sword's Improved Patent Brick Machine, in the Adrian City Directories:
      The clay is taken direct from the bank and made into brick the right temper to place direct from the Machine in the hake on the yard. [...] take the brick direct from the Machine and put them in the hake to dry.

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

hake (third-person singular simple present hakes, present participle haking, simple past and past participle haked)

  1. (UK, dialect) To loiter; to sneak.
    • 1886, English Dialect Society, Publications: Volume 52
      She'd as well been at school as haking about.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


DutchEdit

VerbEdit

hake

  1. singular present subjunctive of haken

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

hake

  1. Woodchips as mass.

DeclensionEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

hake

  1. rōmaji reading of はけ

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

hake f, m (definite singular haka/haken; indefinite plural haker; definite plural hakene)

  1. chin (bottom of face)

hake m (definite singular haken; indefinite plural haker; definite plural hakene)

  1. hook
  2. barb
  3. calk
  4. catch, drawback

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

hake f (definite singular haka, indefinite plural haker, definite plural hakene)

  1. chin (bottom of face)

hake m (definite singular haken, indefinite plural hakar, definite plural hakane)

  1. hook
  2. barb
  3. calk
  4. catch, drawback

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

hake c

  1. catch, latch; a stopping mechanism that prevents something from opening
  2. catch; an unforeseen or concealed problem

DeclensionEdit

Last modified on 15 April 2014, at 22:11