See also: cártel

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

In the business sense, a borrowing from German Kartell, first used by w:Eugen Richter in 1871 in the w:Reichstag. In the political sense, which was the vehicle for this metaphor, the English sense as the German sense is a sixteenth-century borrowing from French cartel, from Italian cartello, diminutive of carta(card, page), from Latin charta.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cartel ‎(plural cartels)

  1. A group of businesses or nations that collude to limit competition within an industry or market.
  2. A combination of political groups (notably parties) for common action.
  3. A written letter of defiance or challenge.
  4. An official agreement concerning the exchange of prisoners.
    • 1852, Washington Irving, Tales from the Alhambra:
      He then sent down a flag of truce in military style, proposing a cartel or exchange of prisoners – the corporal for the notary.
  5. (nautical) A ship used to negotiate with an enemy in time of war, and to exchange prisoners.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian cartello

NounEdit

cartel m ‎(plural cartels)

  1. A cartel

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowing from Catalan cartel.

NounEdit

cartel m ‎(plural carteles)

  1. poster, placard, bill, banner

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowing from English cartel, itself a borrowing from German Kartell.

NounEdit

cartel m ‎(plural carteles)

  1. (Colombia) Alternative form of cártel