Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English ċine, ċinu, from Proto-West Germanic *kinu, from Proto-Germanic *kinō. Forms with /iː/ are influenced by chynen.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʃin(ə)/, /ˈtʃeːn(ə)/, /ˈtʃiːn(ə)/

NounEdit

chyne (plural chynes)

  1. crack (point of breakage)
  2. fissure, chasm
  3. (pathology) opening (of an injury or wound)
DescendantsEdit
  • English: chine (chink)
  • Scots: chin, chun
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French eschine, from Frankish *skinu, from Proto-Germanic *skinō. Doublet of shyn.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʃiːn(ə)/, /ˈtʃin(ə)/

NounEdit

chyne (plural chynes)

  1. The spine; the backbone.
  2. (by extension) The back.
  3. Meat cut from an animal's back.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

chyne

  1. (Northern) Alternative form of cheyne

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

chyne

  1. (Northern) Alternative form of cheynen

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

chyne

  1. Alternative form of chynen