See also: Crack

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English crakken, craken, from Old English cracian (to resound, crack), from Proto-West Germanic *krakōn, from Proto-Germanic *krakōną (to crack, crackle, shriek), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gerh₂- (to resound, cry hoarsely).

Cognate with Scots crak (to crack), West Frisian kreakje (to crack), Dutch kraken (to crunch, creak, squeak), Low German kraken (to crack), German krachen (to crash, crack, creak), Lithuanian gìrgžděti (to creak, squeak), Old Armenian կարկաչ (karkačʿ), Sanskrit गर्जति (gárjati, to roar, hum).

Verb edit

crack (third-person singular simple present cracks, present participle cracking, simple past and past participle cracked)

  1. (intransitive) To form cracks.
    It's been so dry, the ground is starting to crack.
  2. (intransitive) To break apart under force, stress, or pressure.
    When I tried to stand on the chair, it cracked.
  3. (intransitive) To become debilitated by psychological pressure.
    Anyone would crack after being hounded like that.
  4. (intransitive) To break down or yield, especially under interrogation or torture.
    When we showed him the pictures of the murder scene, he cracked.
  5. (intransitive) To make a cracking sound.
    The bat cracked with authority and the ball went for six.
  6. (intransitive, of a voice) To change rapidly in register.
    His voice cracked with emotion.
  7. (intransitive, of a pubescent boy's voice) To alternate between high and low register in the process of eventually lowering.
    His voice finally cracked when he was fourteen.
  8. (intransitive) To make a sharply humorous comment.
    "I would too, with a face like that," she cracked.
  9. (intransitive, LGBT, slang) To realize that one is transgender.
    She cracked at age 22 and came out to her friends and family over the next few months.
  10. (transitive) To make a crack or cracks in.
    The ball cracked the window.
  11. (transitive) To break open or crush to small pieces by impact or stress.
    You'll need a hammer to crack a black walnut.
  12. (transitive) To strike forcefully.
    She cracked him over the head with her handbag.
    • 1914 June 10, “Pillow Fight In Australian Parliament”, in Independence Daily Reporter:
      Bedding provided for late session became ammunition—meet ended in riot when Labor man cracked leader on jaw.
  13. (transitive) To open slightly.
    Could you please crack the window?
  14. (transitive, figurative) To cause to yield under interrogation or other pressure.
    They managed to crack him on the third day.
  15. (transitive, figurative) To solve a difficult problem.
    I've finally cracked it, and of course the answer is obvious in hindsight.
    • 2021 November 17, Conrad Landin, “Network News: Vivarail goes forth with fast-charging batteries”, in RAIL, number 944, page 13:
      "[...] The key to battery trains is more the ability to charge quickly. If you can do that, you've cracked it."
  16. (transitive) To overcome a security system or component.
    It took a minute to crack the lock, three minutes to crack the security system, and about twenty minutes to crack the safe.
    They finally cracked the code.
  17. (transitive) To cause to make a sharp sound.
    to crack a whip
    • 2001, Doug McGuinn, The Apple Indians:
      Hershell cracked his knuckles, a nervous habit that drove Inez crazy []
  18. (transitive) To tell (a joke).
    The performance was fine until he cracked that dead baby joke.
  19. (transitive, chemistry) To break down (a complex molecule), especially with the application of heat: to pyrolyse.
    Acetone is cracked to ketene and methane at 700°C.
  20. (transitive, computing) To circumvent software restrictions such as regional coding or time limits.
    That software licence will expire tomorrow unless we can crack it.
    • 1997 April 1, David McCandless, “Warez Wars”, in Wired[1], →ISSN:
      Nobody really knows how much actual damage cracking does to the software companies. But as the industry rolls apprehensively toward the uncertain future of an ever-more frictionless electronic marketplace, almost everyone thinks piracy will increase.
  21. (transitive, informal) To open a canned beverage, or any packaged drink or food.
    I'd love to crack open a beer.
    Let's crack a tube and watch the game.
    • 1894, The Strand, volume 8, page 569:
      Old Bouvet was waiting in the passage when I entered, and he asked me whether we might not crack a bottle of wine together.
  22. (obsolete) To brag; to boast.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, “Book V, Canto III”, in The Faerie Queene. [], part II (books IV–VI), London: [] [Richard Field] for William Ponsonby, →OCLC, stanza 16, page 216:
      To whom the boaſter, that all knights did blot, / With proud diſdaine did ſcornefull anſwere make; [] And further did vncomely ſpeaches crake.
    • c. 1595–1596 (date written), William Shakespeare, “Loues Labour’s Lost”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act IV, scene iii], page 134, column 2, line 268:
      And Æthiopes of their ſweet complexion crack.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], “Cauſes of Melancholy. Vaine-glory, Pride, Ioy, Praiſe, &c.”, in The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC, partition I, section 2, member 3, subsection 14, page 126:
      Stultitiam ſuam produnt &c. (ſaith Platerus) your very tradeſmen, if they be excellent, will crack and bragge, and ſhew their folly in exceſſe.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], “Cure of Melancholy. Simple alternatives. Compound Alternatiues, Cenſure of Compounds and mixt Phyſick.”, in The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC, partition II, section 4, member 1, subsection v:
      Cardan cracks that he can cure all diſeaſes with water alone, as Hippocrates of old did moſt infirmities with one medicine.
  23. (archaic, colloquial) To be ruined or impaired; to fail.
    • 1697, Virgil, “Dedications”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], →OCLC:
      The credit [] of exchequers cracks, when little comes in and much goes out.
  24. (colloquial) To barely reach or attain (a measurement or extent).
    An underground band that never cracked the Hot 100
    • 2012, The Onion Book of Known Knowledge, page 102:
      IQ (Intelligence Quotient), number said to measure an individual's intelligence that many experts who clearly didn't crack 125 say overlooks important attributes such as creativity and social skills.
Derived terms edit
terms derived from crack (verb)
Related terms edit
  • crazed (exhibiting fine-line cracks)
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also edit

Noun edit

crack (countable and uncountable, plural cracks)

  1. A thin and usually jagged space opened in a previously solid material.
    A large crack had formed in the roadway.
  2. A narrow opening.
    We managed to squeeze through a crack in the rock wall.
    Open the door a crack.
    • 2011 January 25, Phil McNulty, “Blackpool 2 - 3 Man Utd”, in BBC[2]:
      Dimitar Berbatov found the first cracks in the home side's resilience when he pulled one back from close range and Hernandez himself drew the visitors level with a composed finish three minutes later as Bloomfield Road's earlier jubilation turned to despair.
  3. A sharply humorous comment; a wisecrack.
    I didn't appreciate that crack about my hairstyle.
  4. (slang) Crack cocaine, a potent, relatively cheap, addictive variety of cocaine; often a rock, usually smoked through a crack-pipe.
    crack head
    • 1995, “Dear Mama”, in Me Against the World, performed by 2Pac:
      And even as a crack fiend, Mama / You always was a black queen, Mama
    • 2006, Noire [pseudonym], Thug-A-Licious: An Urban Erotic Tale, New York, N.Y.: One World, Ballantine Books, →ISBN, page 122:
      There were times when she could tell the Washingtons were overwhelmed by Jahlil's difficult ways, and one time Jessie even had the nerve to ask Carmiesha if she had smoked anything like crack or ice while she was pregnant with him.
    1. (figurative, humorous) Something good-tasting or habit-forming.
      kitty crackcatnip
      • [2012 March 23, Rob Patronite, Robin Raisfeld, “Your Brain on Food”, in New York Magazine:
        When did naming foods after a powerful narcotic become a thing? [] Now the mean streets of New York are rife with “salted crack caramel” ice cream, “pistachio crack” brittle, “crack steak” sandwiches, and “tuna on crack.”]
  5. (onomatopoeia) The sharp sound made when solid material breaks.
    The crack of the falling branch could be heard for miles.
  6. (onomatopoeia) Any sharp sound.
    The crack of the bat hitting the ball.
    • 2011 June 28, Piers Newbery, “Wimbledon 2011: Sabine Lisicki beats Marion Bartoli”, in BBC Sport[3]:
      She broke to love in the opening game, only for Bartoli to hit straight back in game two, which was interrupted by a huge crack of thunder that made Lisicki jump and prompted nervous laughter from the 15,000 spectators.
  7. A sharp, resounding blow.
    • 1852 March – 1853 September, Charles Dickens, chapter 11, in Bleak House, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1853, →OCLC:
      Mrs. Perkins, who has not been for some weeks on speaking terms with Mrs. Piper in consequence for an unpleasantness originating in young Perkins' having "fetched" young Piper "a crack," renews her friendly intercourse on this auspicious occasion.
  8. (informal) An attempt at something.
    I'd like to take a crack at that game.
  9. (vulgar, slang) The vagina.
  10. (informal) The space between the buttocks.
    Synonym: buttcrack
    Pull up your pants! Your crack is showing.
  11. (Northern England, Scotland, Ireland) Conviviality; fun; good conversation, chat, gossip, or humorous storytelling; good company.
    The party was great crack.
    He's good crack. [It's nice having him around]
    • 2001, William F. Gray, The Villain, iUniverse, page 214:
      Being a native of Northumberland, she was enjoying their banter and Geordie good humour. This was what she needed — good company and good crack.
    • 2004, Bill Griffiths, Dictionary of North East Dialect, Northumbria University Press (quoting Dunn, 1950)
      "his a bit o' good crack — interesting to talk to"
    • 2006, Patrick McCabe, Winterwood, Bloomsbury, published 2007, page 10:
      By the time we've got a good drunk on us there'll be more crack in this valley than the night I pissed on the electric fence!
  12. (Northern England, Scotland, Ireland) Business; events; news.
    What's the crack?
    What's this crack about a possible merger?
  13. (computing) A program or procedure designed to circumvent restrictions or usage limits on software.
    Has anyone got a crack for DocumentWriter 3.0?
  14. (hydrodynamics, US, dated) An expanding circle of white water surrounding the site of a large explosion at shallow depth, marking the progress of the shock wave through the air above the water.
     
    A nuclear explosion in shallow water; the crack is clearly visible on the water's surface.
    Coordinate term: slick
  15. (Cumbria, elsewhere throughout the North of the UK) a meaningful chat.
  16. (Internet slang) Extremely silly, absurd or off-the-wall ideas or prose.
  17. The tone of voice when changed at puberty.
  18. (archaic) A mental flaw; a touch of craziness; partial insanity.
    He has a crack.
  19. (archaic) A crazy or crack-brained person.
    Synonym: crackpot
    • 1711 December 29 (Gregorian calendar), [Joseph Addison; Richard Steele et al.], “TUESDAY, December 18, 1711”, in The Spectator, number 251; republished in Alexander Chalmers, editor, The Spectator; a New Edition, [], volume III, New York, N.Y.: D[aniel] Appleton & Company, 1853, →OCLC, pages 251-256:
      On the London Cries [] I have lately received a letter from some very odd fellow upon this subject [] ‘Sir, [] , but I cannot get the parliament to listen to me ; who look upon me, forsooth, as a crack and a projector [] I am, SIR, &c. / RALPH CROTCHET’
      The spelling has been modernized.
  20. (obsolete) A boast; boasting.
  21. (obsolete) Breach of chastity.
  22. (obsolete) A boy, generally a pert, lively boy.
  23. (slang, dated, UK) A brief time; an instant; a jiffy.
    I'll be with you in a crack.
Usage notes edit
  • (Scots language, common in lowland Scotland and Ulster, conviviality): In recent decades, the word has been adopted into Gaelic as craic.
Synonyms edit
  • (vulgar: space between the buttocks): bum crack (UK), arse crack (UK), ass crack (US)
Derived terms edit
terms derived from crack (noun)
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2 edit

Of unknown origin.

Adjective edit

crack (not comparable)

  1. Highly trained and competent.
    Even a crack team of investigators would have trouble solving this case.
  2. Excellent, first-rate, superior, top-notch.
    She's a crack shot with that rifle.
    • 1849 May – 1850 November, Charles Dickens, chapter 38, in The Personal History of David Copperfield, London: Bradbury & Evans, [], published 1850, →OCLC:
      Every scratch in the scheme was a gnarled oak in the forest of difficulty, and I went on cutting them down, one after another, with such vigour, that in three or four months I was in a condition to make an experiment on one of our crack speakers in the Commons.
    • 1962 April, J. N. Faulkner, “Summer Saturday at Waterloo”, in Modern Railways, page 264:
      Fortunately, it is unusual for the crack transatlantic liners to sail or dock on a Saturday, but it is the custom for most holiday cruises to start on that day, returning on Fridays a fortnight or three weeks later.
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Noun edit

crack (plural cracks)

  1. (obsolete) One who excels; the best.
    • 1888 [1637], James Shirley, Hyde Park, act IV, scene iii, page 236:
      1st Gent. What dost think, Jockey? / 2nd Gent. The crack o' the field's against you.
Descendants edit
  • Catalan: crac
  • French: crack
  • German: Crack
  • Portuguese: craque
  • Spanish: crack
Translations edit

Further reading edit

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

From English crack.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkræk/, [ˈkræk]

Noun edit

crack

  1. crack (variety of cocaine)

Declension edit

Inflection of crack (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative crack crackit
genitive crackin crackien
partitive crackiä crackejä
illative crackiin crackeihin
singular plural
nominative crack crackit
accusative nom. crack crackit
gen. crackin
genitive crackin crackien
partitive crackiä crackejä
inessive crackissä crackeissä
elative crackistä crackeistä
illative crackiin crackeihin
adessive crackillä crackeillä
ablative crackiltä crackeiltä
allative crackille crackeille
essive crackinä crackeinä
translative crackiksi crackeiksi
abessive crackittä crackeittä
instructive crackein
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of crack (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative crackini crackini
accusative nom. crackini crackini
gen. crackini
genitive crackini crackieni
partitive crackiäni crackejäni
inessive crackissäni crackeissäni
elative crackistäni crackeistäni
illative crackiini crackeihini
adessive crackilläni crackeilläni
ablative crackiltäni crackeiltäni
allative crackilleni crackeilleni
essive crackinäni crackeinäni
translative crackikseni crackeikseni
abessive crackittäni crackeittäni
instructive
comitative crackeineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative crackisi crackisi
accusative nom. crackisi crackisi
gen. crackisi
genitive crackisi crackiesi
partitive crackiäsi crackejäsi
inessive crackissäsi crackeissäsi
elative crackistäsi crackeistäsi
illative crackiisi crackeihisi
adessive crackilläsi crackeilläsi
ablative crackiltäsi crackeiltäsi
allative crackillesi crackeillesi
essive crackinäsi crackeinäsi
translative crackiksesi crackeiksesi
abessive crackittäsi crackeittäsi
instructive
comitative crackeinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative crackimme crackimme
accusative nom. crackimme crackimme
gen. crackimme
genitive crackimme crackiemme
partitive crackiämme crackejämme
inessive crackissämme crackeissämme
elative crackistämme crackeistämme
illative crackiimme crackeihimme
adessive crackillämme crackeillämme
ablative crackiltämme crackeiltämme
allative crackillemme crackeillemme
essive crackinämme crackeinämme
translative crackiksemme crackeiksemme
abessive crackittämme crackeittämme
instructive
comitative crackeinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative crackinne crackinne
accusative nom. crackinne crackinne
gen. crackinne
genitive crackinne crackienne
partitive crackiänne crackejänne
inessive crackissänne crackeissänne
elative crackistänne crackeistänne
illative crackiinne crackeihinne
adessive crackillänne crackeillänne
ablative crackiltänne crackeiltänne
allative crackillenne crackeillenne
essive crackinänne crackeinänne
translative crackiksenne crackeiksenne
abessive crackittänne crackeittänne
instructive
comitative crackeinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative crackinsä crackinsä
accusative nom. crackinsä crackinsä
gen. crackinsä
genitive crackinsä crackiensä
partitive crackiään
crackiänsä
crackejään
crackejänsä
inessive crackissään
crackissänsä
crackeissään
crackeissänsä
elative crackistään
crackistänsä
crackeistään
crackeistänsä
illative crackiinsä crackeihinsä
adessive crackillään
crackillänsä
crackeillään
crackeillänsä
ablative crackiltään
crackiltänsä
crackeiltään
crackeiltänsä
allative crackilleen
crackillensä
crackeilleen
crackeillensä
essive crackinään
crackinänsä
crackeinään
crackeinänsä
translative crackikseen
crackiksensä
crackeikseen
crackeiksensä
abessive crackittään
crackittänsä
crackeittään
crackeittänsä
instructive
comitative crackeineen
crackeinensä

Further reading edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English crack.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

crack m (plural cracks)

  1. (colloquial) champion, ace, expert
    Synonyms: champion, as
    C’est un crack en informatique.He/she is a computer whiz.
  2. (computing) crack (program or procedure designed to circumvent restrictions)

Noun edit

crack f (uncountable)

  1. crack cocaine

Further reading edit

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English crack.

Pronunciation edit

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkɾak/, /ˈkɾa.ki/
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkɾak/, /ˈkɾa.ke/

Noun edit

crack m (plural cracks)

  1. Alternative form of craque

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Unadapted borrowing from English crack.

Noun edit

crack m (plural cracks)

  1. crack cocaine
  2. champion, ace, pro, wizard, dude (outstanding person)
Usage notes edit

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from French krach, from German Krach.

Noun edit

crack m (plural cracks)

  1. Misspelling of crac.

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English crack.

Noun edit

crack n or c

  1. (uncountable, colloquial) crack cocaine

Declension edit

Declension of crack 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative crack cracket
Genitive cracks crackets
Declension of crack 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative crack cracken
Genitive cracks crackens