fissure

See also: fissuré

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fissure, from Old French fissure, from Latin fissūra (a cleft, chink), from findō (to cleave, split, divide) +‎ -tūra (nominal suffix).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fissure (plural fissures)

  1. A long, narrow crack or opening made by breaking or splitting, especially in rock or earth.
    Hyponym: microfissure
    • 1960 April, J. P. Wilson; E. N. C. Haywood, “The route through the Peak—Derby to Manchester: Part Two”, in Trains Illustrated, page 224:
      After Miller's Dale Junction, the main Derby-Manchester line crosses the Wye for the last time and turns north-west up Great Rocks Dale, a natural fissure several miles long.
  2. (anatomy) A groove, deep furrow, elongated cleft or tear between body parts or in the substance of an organ; a sulcus.
    Hyponyms: anal fissure, anterior median fissure, longitudinal fissure, orbital fissure, palpebral fissure, Rolandic fissure, sylvian fissure
  3. (anatomy) A break or slit in tissue usually at the junction of skin and mucous membrane.
  4. A state of incompatibility or disagreement.
    Synonym: schism

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fissure (third-person singular simple present fissures, present participle fissuring, simple past and past participle fissured)

  1. To split, forming fissures.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, borrowed from Latin fissura.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fi.syʁ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -yʁ

NounEdit

fissure f (plural fissures)

  1. fissure

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

fissure

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fissurer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fissurer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of fissurer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of fissurer
  5. second-person singular imperative of fissurer

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

fissūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of fissūrus

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French fissure, from Latin fissūra.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fissure (Late Middle English, rare)

  1. (anatomy) fissure, rupture
  2. (surgery) incision

DescendantsEdit

  • English: fissure

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

fissure

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fissurar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fissurar
  3. first-person singular imperative of fissurar
  4. third-person singular imperative of fissurar