Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Equivalent to ċēap (cost) + -e (having). Corresponds to a Proto-Germanic *kaupijaz, though there are no cognates.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ċīepe

  1. for sale
    • c. 992, Ælfric, "Pope Gregory the Great"
      Þā ġeseah hē betwēox þām warum ċīepe cneohtas ġesette. Þā wǣron hwītes līchaman and fæġeres andwlitan menn and æðellīċe ġefeaxode.
      Then he saw a group of boys who had been displayed for sale with the rest of the merchandise. (Literally: “Then he saw boys for sale placed among the merchandise.”) They had fair skin, beautiful faces, and noble heads of hair.
Usage notesEdit
  • Unlike the Modern English phrase “for sale,” ċīepe is often used attributively, before the noun.
DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin cēpa, caepa.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ċiepe f

  1. onion
SynonymsEdit