See also: Convoy

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French convoier, another form of conveier, from Medieval Latin convio (to accompany on the way), from Latin com- (together) + via (way).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒn.vɔɪ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

 
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convoy (plural convoys)

  1. (nautical) One or more merchant ships sailing in company to the same general destination under the protection of naval vessels.
  2. A group of vehicles travelling together for safety, especially one with an escort.
  3. The act of convoying; protection.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

convoy (third-person singular simple present convoys, present participle convoying, simple past and past participle convoyed)

  1. (transitive) To escort a group of vehicles, and provide protection.
    A frigate convoys a merchantman.
    • (Can we date this quote by Emerson and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      I know ye skilful to convoy / The total freight of hope and joy.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English convoy, itself from French convoi.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

convoy m (plural convoyes)

  1. convoy

ReferencesEdit