See also: vía, viâ, and vi'a

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈvaɪə/, /ˈviə/

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowing from Latin via ‎(road), of uncertain origin, plausibly cognate with vehere ‎(to conduct).

NounEdit

via ‎(plural vias or viae)

  1. A main road or highway, especially in ancient Rome. (Mainly used in set phrases, below.)
  2. (electronics) A small hole in a printed circuit board filled with metal which connects two or more layers.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowing from Latin viā, ablative singular of via ‎(way, road).

Alternative formsEdit

PrepositionEdit

via

  1. By way of; passing through.
    They drove from New York to Los Angeles via Omaha.
    You can enter the building via the western gate.
  2. By (means of); using (a medium).
    I'll send you the information via e-mail.
    • 2012 December 1, “An internet of airborne things”, in The Economist[1], volume 405, number 8813, page 3 (Technology Quarterly):
      A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer. A supplier many miles away would then take the part to the local matternet station for airborne dispatch via drone.
  3. As per (a mathematical equation).
    • 2005, Enrico Forestieri (ed.), “Capacity Bounds For MIMO Poisson Channels With Intersymbol Interference, Appendix C”, in Optical Communication Theory and Techniques, ISBN 0387231323, page 44:
      Under the assumptions of Proposition 5 the entropies h(τ) and H(k) are related via the following equation: […]
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin viā.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

via f ‎(plural vies)

  1. lane
  2. way, path
  3. railway track
  4. channel

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

PrepositionEdit

via

  1. via, by way of

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin viā, the ablative of via ‎(road, way), of uncertain origin, plausibly cognate with vehere ‎(to conduct). Entered Dutch in the Latin phrase per via de ‎(by way of), after the Portuguese por via de.

PrepositionEdit

via

  1. via, through, by way of
  2. by (means of); using (a medium).

SynonymsEdit

  • (through (by way of)): langs
  • (by (means of)): per

Derived termsEdit

  • via via ‎(using various intermediaries)

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Esperanto second-person pronoun vi + possessive ending -a.

DeterminerEdit

via ‎(accusative singular vian, plural viaj, accusative plural viajn)

  1. (possessive) your, yours

See alsoEdit


FijianEdit

FinnishEdit

AdverbEdit

via

  1. via

AnagramsEdit


Franco-ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīta, from vīvō, vīvere ‎(live), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷeih₃w- ‎(to live).

NounEdit

via f ‎(plural vies)

  1. life

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin viā, the ablative of via ‎(road, way), of uncertain origin, plausibly cognate with vehō ‎(convey).

PrepositionEdit

via

  1. via, through, by way of.

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin via.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈvia/, [ˈviː.a]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: vì‧a

NounEdit

via f ‎(plural vie)

  1. road, street, path
  2. way, route
  3. means (to an end)
  4. tract (in the body)
  5. start (of a race)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

via

  1. away
  2. out

PrepositionEdit

via da

  1. away from

InterjectionEdit

via!

  1. come on!
  2. go away!

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia la

EtymologyEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

via f ‎(genitive viae); first declension

  1. road, street or path
  2. way, method, manner
  3. the right way

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative via viae
genitive viae viārum
dative viae viīs
accusative viam viās
ablative viā viīs
vocative via viae

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • via in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • via in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • VIA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • via in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the country-house stands near the road: villa tangit viam
    • the road is the same length: tantundem viae est
    • to pave a road: viam sternere (silice, saxo)
    • to make a gravel path: substruere viam glarea (Liv. 41. 27)
    • a street, a made road: via strata
    • a well-trodden, much-frequented way: via trita
    • to make a road: viam munire
    • to open a route: viam patefacere, aperire
    • to cut one's way (through the enemies' ranks): ferro viam facere (per confertos hostes)
    • to obstruct a road; to close a route: viam intercludere
    • a road leads somewhere: via fert, ducit aliquo
    • to set out on a journey: in viam se dare
    • to set out on a journey: viae se committere
    • to enter upon a route; to take a road: viam ingredi, inire (also metaphorically)
    • to turn aside from the right way; to deviate: de via declinare, deflectere (also metaphorically)
    • make way for any one: (de via) decedere alicui
    • to set out by the Appian road: Appia via proficisci
    • to direct a person who has lost his way: erranti viam monstrare
    • to continue one's journey, pursue one's course: viam persequi (also metaphorically)
    • to accomplish a long journey: longam viam conficere
    • weary with travelling; way-worn: fessus de via
    • in a straight line: recta (regione, via); in directum
    • to bring a person back to the right way: in viam reducere aliquem
    • to return to the right way: in viam redire
    • to enter upon a career: viam vitae ingredi (Flacc. 42. 105)
    • to give a scientific explanation of a thing: artificio et via tradere aliquid
    • to proceed, carry on a discussion logically: ratione et via, via et ratione progredi, disputare (Or. 33. 116)
    • to walk in the ways of virtue: viam virtutis ingredi (Off. 1. 32. 118)
    • to receive tenders for the construction of temples, highroads: locare aedes, vias faciendas (Phil. 9. 7. 16)
  • via in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill
  2. ^ Edward A. Roberts, Bárbara Pastor, Diccionario etimológico indoeuropeo de la lengua española, Alianza Editorial 2009, ISBN 978-84-206-5252-8

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

via

  1. simple past of vie
  2. past participle of vie

PortugueseEdit

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese via, from Latin via ‎(road). See Latin via for details.

NounEdit

via f (plural vias)

  1. a way; a path
  2. (rail transport) gauge (distance between the rails of a railway)
  3. medium (means or channel by which an aim is achieved)
  4. an example of a document
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Directly from Latin via ‎(road).

PrepositionEdit

via

  1. via (by way of; passing through)
  2. via (by means of; using a medium)

NounEdit

via f (plural vias)

  1. (historical) via (road built by the ancient Romans)

Etymology 3Edit

Inflected form of ver ‎(to see).

VerbEdit

via

  1. First-person singular (eu) imperfect indicative of ver
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) imperfect indicative of ver

RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowing from French and Latin via.

PrepositionEdit

via ‎(+accusative)

  1. via, by

Etymology 2Edit

From an older form vie, from Latin vīvere, present active infinitive of vīvō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʷeih₃w- ‎(to live).

Alternative formsEdit

  • vie (regional, archaic)

VerbEdit

a via ‎(third-person singular present viază, past participle viat1st conj.

  1. (rare) to have life; to live, exist
  2. (of intangibles, such as emotions and beliefs) to endure
ConjugationEdit
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Form of the adjective viu.

AdjectiveEdit

via

  1. inflection of viu ‎(live, alive):
    1. definite feminine singular nominative
    2. definite feminine singular accusative

Etymology 4Edit

Form of the noun vie.

NounEdit

via

  1. inflection of vie ‎(the vineyard):
    1. definite singular nominative
    2. definite singular accusative

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) veia

EtymologyEdit

From Latin via.

NounEdit

via f (plural vias)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Puter, Vallader) road, street; way

SynonymsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan: road, street) strada

SwedishEdit

PrepositionEdit

via

  1. via, over, by, through
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