coronet

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French couronnette, from Old French coronete, diminutive of corone (crown), from Latin corona.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒɹənɪt/, /kɒɹəˈnɛt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɔɹənɪt/, /kɔɹəˈnɛt/

NounEdit

coronet (plural coronets)

 
An earl's coronet.
  1. A small crown, such as is worn by a noble.
    • 1813, Percy Bysshe Shelley, “Canto I”, in Queen Mab; [], London: [] P. B. Shelley, [], OCLC 36924440, page 6:
      [T]he fair star / That gems the glittering coronet of morn, / Sheds not a light so mild, so powerful, / As that which, bursting from the Fairy's form, / Spread a purpureal halo round the scene, / Yet with an undulating motion, / Swayed to her outline gracefully.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, “Lady Clara Vere de Vere”, in Poems. [...] In Two Volumes, volume I, London: Edward Moxon, [], OCLC 1008064829, page 158:
      Kind hearts are more than coronets, / And simple faith than Norman blood.
  2. The ring of tissue between a horse's hoof and its leg.
  3. The traditional lowest regular commissioned officer rank in the cavalry.
  4. Any of several hummingbirds in the genus Boissonneaua.
  5. A species of moth, Craniophora ligustri.

SynonymsEdit

(junior commissioned officer):

  • ensign (infantry equivalent of the cavalry coronet)
  • second lieutenant (OF-1), first NATO commissioned officer grade above OF-0 trainee officer

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

corōnet

  1. third-person singular present active subjunctive of corōnō