Last modified on 8 March 2015, at 10:31

cuid

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cuit (part, portion, share), from Proto-Celtic *kʷezdis (compare Welsh peth (thing), Breton péz (piece)). Doublet of píosa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cuid f (genitive coda, plural codanna)

  1. part
  2. portion
  3. used with non-inalienable mass nouns and plural count nouns as a kind of measure word after a possessive pronoun or before a genitive
    mo chuid leabhar ― my books (lit. ‘my portion of books’)
    do chuid ceoil ― your music (lit. ‘your portion of music’)
    a cuid grianghraf ― her pictures (lit. ‘her portion of pictures’)
    ár gcuid físeán ― our videos (lit. ‘our portion of videos’)
    cuid éadaigh Sheáin ― Seán’s clothing (lit. ‘Seán’s portion of clothing’)

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

The measure-word meaning of cuid is not used with inalienable nouns like relatives and body parts (leg, hand etc.):

  • deartháireacha an bhuachalla ― the boy’s brothers (not *cuid deartháireacha an bhuachalla)
  • mo chosa ― my legs (not *mo chuid cosa)

However, cuid may used with hair, teeth etc.

  • do chuid gruaige ― your hair
  • a chuid fiacla ― his teeth

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cuid chuid gcuid
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old ProvençalEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cuid

  1. present first-person singular form of cuidar

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cuit (part, portion, share), from Proto-Celtic *kʷezdis (compare Welsh peth (thing), Breton péz (piece)).

NounEdit

cuid f (genitive codach, plural codaichean)

  1. part, portion, share, ingredient

Usage notesEdit

  • Sometimes used where English uses pronoun:
    cuid dhiubh ― some of them (literally "part of them")
    a’ chuid eile ― the others (literally "the other part")

Derived termsEdit