See also: CODA and côda

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
The symbol for a musical coda.

Borrowed from Italian coda (literally tail).

NounEdit

coda (plural codas)

  1. (music) A passage that brings a movement or piece to a conclusion through prolongation.
    Synonym: finale
    Coordinate terms: chorus, refrain
  2. (phonology) The optional final part of a syllable, placed after its nucleus, and usually composed of one or more consonants.
    Synonym: auslaut
    Antonym: onset
    Coordinate terms: onset, nucleus, rime
    Holonym: syllable
    The word “salts” has three consonants — /l/, /t/, and /s/ — in its coda, whereas the word “glee” has no coda at all.
  3. (geology) In seismograms, the gradual return to baseline after a seismic event. The length of the coda can be used to estimate event magnitude, and the shape sometimes reveals details of subsurface structures.
  4. (figuratively) A conclusion (of a statement or event, for example), final portion, tail end.
    • 2004, Alan Hollinghurst, chapter 9, in The Line of Beauty, New York: Bloomsbury, OCLC 1036692193:
      Downstairs, a little later, in the drawing room, the coda of the party was unwinding, and Gerald opening new bottles of champagne as though he made no distinction between the boring drunks who "sat," and the knowing few of the inner circle, gathered round the empty marble fireplace.
    • 2014, Paul Salopek, Blessed. Cursed. Claimed., National Geographic (December 2014)[1]
      In gray stormy light, their painted eyes stare out at the Mediterranean—at Homer’s wine-dark sea, at a corridor into modernity. But in memory my walk’s true coda in the Middle East came earlier.
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

coda (plural codas)

  1. Alternative spelling of CODA

AnagramsEdit


AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin cōda, from Latin cauda.

NounEdit

coda f (plural codas)

  1. tail

CorsicanEdit

NounEdit

coda f

  1. tail

ReferencesEdit

  • coda” in INFCOR: Banca di dati di a lingua corsa

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian coda. Doublet of queue.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coda f (plural codas)

  1. (music) coda
  2. (phonology) a syllable coda
    Coordinate terms: attaque, noyau

VerbEdit

coda

  1. third-person singular past historic of coder

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coda f

  1. genitive singular of cuid

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
coda choda gcoda
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin coda, variant of Latin cauda.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈko.da/
  • Rhymes: -oda
  • Hyphenation: có‧da

NounEdit

coda f (plural code)

  1. tail
  2. queue; line
    Synonym: fila
  3. (music) coda
    Synonym: (diminutive) codetta
    Antonyms: introduzione, (music) ouverture, (music) preludio
  4. (rail transport, only singular, uncountable) end (of a train), the last car(s)
    Antonym: testa
    La prima classe è in coda al trenoThe first class is at the end of the train

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Alternative form of cauda, showing 'rustic' monophthongization of /au̯/ to /oː/.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cōda f (genitive cōdae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin, Vulgar Latin) tail

Usage notesEdit

Also found in some classical Latin texts alongside the primary form cauda, though uncommon.

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cōda cōdae
Genitive cōdae cōdārum
Dative cōdae cōdīs
Accusative cōdam cōdās
Ablative cōdā cōdīs
Vocative cōda cōdae

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • coda”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • coda”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • coda in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • coda in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French coder.

VerbEdit

a coda (third-person singular present codează, past participle codat1st conj.

  1. to code, to encode

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

coda f (plural codas)

  1. (music) coda
  2. (phonology) coda

AdjectiveEdit

coda f

  1. feminine singular of codo

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

coda c

  1. (music) coda

DeclensionEdit

Declension of coda 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative coda codan codor codorna
Genitive codas codans codors codornas