See also: Czar

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

See tsar. The spelling czar, the older spelling in English, comes from Sigismund von Herberstein's Rerum Moscoviticarum Commentarii ("Notes on Muscovite Affairs") of 1549. The alternative tsar began to replace it in the 19th century.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /zɑː(ɹ)/, /tsɑː(ɹ)/
  • (file)

NounEdit

czar (plural czars)

  1. Alternative spelling of tsar (especially common in American English)
    • 1555, Peter Martyr d’Anghiera, Richard Eden, transl., The decades of the newe worlde or west India[1], London: William Powell, page 290:
      Note therfore that Czar in the Ruthens tounge signifieth a kynge, wheras in the language of the Slauons, Pollons, Bohemes, and other, the same woorde Czar, signifieth Cesar by whiche name Themperours haue byn commonly cauled.
  2. (informal, US politics) An appointed official tasked to regulate or oversee a specific area.
    drug czar
    • 2020 May 8, Jayne O'Donnell, “'Deaths of despair': Coronavirus pandemic could push suicide, drug deaths as high as 150k, study says”, in USA Today[2], archived from the original on 9 May 2020:
      The federal mental health czar is calling for more money to expand services to help people suffering amid the social isolation imposed by the coronavirus pandemic []

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
"À sa Majesté Alexandre III Czar de toutes les Russies", Marche Russe by Louis Ganne

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

czar m (plural czars)

  1. Archaic spelling of tsar.

Further readingEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *čarъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *ker- *kēr-, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷer-.

NounEdit

czar m inan

  1. spell (magic)
    Synonyms: zaklęcie, urok
  2. allure, charm (quality of inspiring delight or admiration)
    Synonym: urok
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

czar

  1. genitive plural of czara

Further readingEdit

  • czar in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • czar in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

 
czar

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Old Church Slavonic цѣсарь (cěsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar. Doublet of César and kaiser

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

czar m (plural czares, feminine czarina, feminine plural czarinas)

  1. tsar