EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar[1]. Doublet of kaiser. The spelling tsar began to replace the older czar in the nineteenth century.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tsar (plural tsars)

  1. (historical) An emperor of Russia (1547 to 1917) and of some South Slavic states.
    • 1832 August 1, W. Barnes, “On the Origin of Language”, in Gentleman's Magazine[1], London, page 129:
      and why, in the name of common sense, should the English call the Czar (tsar) of Russia raze?
  2. (figuratively) A person with great power; an autocrat.

Usage notesEdit

  • (emperor of Russia): Officially, emperors after 1721 were styled imperator (импера́тор (imperátor)) rather than tsar (царь (carʹ)), but the latter term is still commonly applied to them.
  • The term sometimes refers to other emperors, besides those of Russia, e.g. the monarch of Bulgaria (1908-1946).
  • The spelling czar is the most common one in the US, especially in figurative and informal senses. Scholarly literature prefers tsar.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Funk, W. J., Word origins and their romantic stories, New York, Wilfred Funk, Inc.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

tsar m (plural tsars)

  1. tsar

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar. Doublet of César.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tsar m (plural tsars)

  1. czar (Russian nobility)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

NounEdit

tsar m (plural tsares)

  1. tsar

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌹𐍃𐌰𐍂 (kaisar), from Latin Caesar

NounEdit

tsar m (definite singular tsaren, indefinite plural tsarer, definite plural tsarene)

  1. a tsar or czar

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌹𐍃𐌰𐍂 (kaisar), from Latin Caesar

NounEdit

tsar m (definite singular tsaren, indefinite plural tsarar, definite plural tsarane)

  1. a tsar or czar

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

tsar m (plural tsares, feminine tsarina, feminine plural tsarinas)

  1. Alternative form of czar

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar

NounEdit

tsar c

  1. tsar

DeclensionEdit

Declension of tsar 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tsar tsaren tsarer tsarerna
Genitive tsars tsarens tsarers tsarernas

AnagramsEdit


Tocharian AEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Tocharian [Term?], from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰésōr, from *ǵʰes-. Cognate with Albanian dorë, Ancient Greek χείρ (kheír), Old Armenian ձեռն (jeṙn), Hittite [script needed] (kessar). Compare Tocharian B ṣar.

NounEdit

tsar m

  1. hand