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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar.[1]. Doublet of kaiser.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tsar (plural tsars)

  1. (historical) An emperor of Russia (1547 to 1917) and of some South Slavic states.
  2. (figuratively) A person with great power; an autocrat.
  3. (informal, politics, US) An appointed official tasked to regulate or oversee a specific area.
    drug czar

Usage notesEdit

  • (emperor of Russia): Officially, emperors after 1721 were styled imperator (импера́тор (imperátor)) rather than tsar (царь (carʹ)), but the latter term is still commonly applied to them.
  • The term sometimes refers to other emperors, besides those of Russia.
  • The spelling czar is most common one in the US, especially in the figurative and informal senses. Scholarly literature prefers tsar.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Funk, W. J., Word origins and their romantic stories, New York, Wilfred Funk, Inc.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

tsar m (plural tsars)

  1. tsar

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar. Doublet of César.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tsar m (plural tsars)

  1. czar (Russian nobility)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

NounEdit

tsar m (plural tsares)

  1. tsar

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌹𐍃𐌰𐍂 (kaisar), from Latin Caesar

NounEdit

tsar m (definite singular tsaren, indefinite plural tsarer, definite plural tsarene)

  1. a tsar or czar

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌹𐍃𐌰𐍂 (kaisar), from Latin Caesar

NounEdit

tsar m (definite singular tsaren, indefinite plural tsarar, definite plural tsarane)

  1. a tsar or czar

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

tsar m (plural tsares, feminine tsarina, feminine plural tsarinas)

  1. Alternative form of czar

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar

NounEdit

tsar c

  1. tsar

DeclensionEdit

Declension of tsar 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tsar tsaren tsarer tsarerna
Genitive tsars tsarens tsarers tsarernas

Tocharian AEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Tocharian [Term?], from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰésōr, from *ǵʰes-. Cognate with Albanian dorë, Ancient Greek χείρ (kheír), Old Armenian ձեռն (jeṙn), Hittite [script needed] (kessar). Compare Tocharian B ṣar.

NounEdit

tsar m

  1. hand