dangerous

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dangerous (difficult, severe, domineering, arrogant, fraught with danger), daungerous, from Anglo-Norman [Term?], from Old French dangereus (threatening, difficult), from dangier. Equivalent to danger +‎ -ous.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdeɪnʒ(ə)ɹəs/, /ˈdeɪnd͡ʒ(ə)ɹəs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdeɪnd͡ʒəɹəs/, /ˈdeɪnd͡ʒɚəs/, /ˈdeɪnd͡ʒɚs/, /ˈdeɪnʒɹəs/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dan‧ger‧ous

AdjectiveEdit

dangerous (comparative more dangerous, superlative most dangerous)

  1. Full of danger.
    Railway crossings without gates are highly dangerous.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 0029:
      “[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  2. Causing danger; ready to do harm or injury.
  3. (colloquial, dated) In a condition of danger, as from illness; threatened with death.
  4. (obsolete) Hard to suit; difficult to please.
  5. (obsolete) Reserved; not affable.

Usage notesEdit

The standard comparative and superlative are more dangerous and most dangerous; the forms dangerouser and dangerousest or dangerest exist but are nonstandard.

SynonymsEdit

(full of danger):

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


OccitanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dangerous m (feminine singular dangerouso, masculine plural dangerous, feminine plural dangerousos)

  1. (Mistralian) Alternative form of dangeirós