EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English daunger (power, dominion, peril), from Anglo-Norman dangier, from Old French dangier, alteration of Old French dongier (due to association with Latin damnum (damage)) from Vulgar Latin *dominārium (authority, power) from Latin dominus (lord, master).[1] Displaced native Old English frēcennes.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

danger (countable and uncountable, plural dangers)

  1. Exposure to likely harm; peril.
    There's plenty of danger in the desert.
    • 1821-1822, William Hazlitt, Table-Talk
      Danger is a good teacher, and makes apt scholars.
  2. An instance or cause of likely harm.
    • September 1, 1884, William Gladstone, Second Midlothian Speech
      Two territorial questions [] unsettled [] each of which was a positive danger to the peace of Europe.
  3. (obsolete) Mischief.
  4. (mainly outside US, rail transport) The stop indication of a signal (usually in the phrase "at danger").
    The north signal was at danger because of the rockslide.
  5. (obsolete) Ability to harm; someone's dominion or power to harm or penalise. See in one's danger, below.
  6. (obsolete) Liability.
    • 1526, Bible, tr. William Tyndale, Matthew V:
      Thou shalt not kyll. Whosoever shall kyll, shalbe in daunger of iudgement.
  7. (obsolete) Difficulty; sparingness.
  8. (obsolete) Coyness; disdainful behavior.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

danger (third-person singular simple present dangers, present participle dangering, simple past and past participle dangered)

  1. (obsolete) To claim liability.
  2. (obsolete) To imperil; to endanger.
  3. (obsolete) To run the risk.

QuotationsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “danger”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • Oxford English Dictionary

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dangier, alteration of Old French dongier (due to association with Latin damnum (damage)) from Vulgar Latin *domniārium (authority, power) from Latin dominus (lord, master).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

danger m (plural dangers)

  1. danger
  2. jeopardy (danger of loss, harm, or failure)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit