deadlock

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From dead +‎ lock.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deadlock (countable and uncountable, plural deadlocks)

  1. A standstill resulting from the opposition of two evenly matched forces; a stalemate or impasse.
    The negotation ended in deadlock, with neither party willing to compromise on the price.
  2. (computing) An inability to continue due to two programs or devices each requiring a response from the other before completing an operation.
    Coordinate terms: livelock, starvation
    • 2000, Douglas Lea, Concurrent Programming in Java, Addison-Wesley Professional, →ISBN, page 88:
      If synchronization is always performed in least-first order with respect to object tags, then situations can never arise in which one thread has the synchronization lock for x while waiting for y and another has the lock for y while waiting for x. Instead, they will both obtain the locks in the same order, thus avoiding this form of deadlock.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

deadlock (third-person singular simple present deadlocks, present participle deadlocking, simple past and past participle deadlocked)

  1. (intransitive) To cause or come to a deadlock.
    • 2004, Scott Oaks; Henry Wong, Java Threads, O'Reilly Media, →ISBN, page 123:
      Since we cannot solve this problem completely, it may sometimes be better to use explicit locks and risk deadlock if a thread exits unexpectedly. It may be better to have a deadlocked system than to have a corrupted system.

Further readingEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

deadlock m

  1. (computing) deadlock

SynonymsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English deadlock.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˌdɛd.ˈlɔ.ki/, /ˌdɛ.d͡ʒi.ˈlɔ.ki/

NounEdit

deadlock m (plural deadlocks)

  1. (computing) deadlock (inability to continue operating due to two processes requiring a response from one other)