EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

[1851] Borrowed from French impasse, from French in- + passer.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
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impasse (plural impasses)

  1. a road with no exit; a cul-de-sac
  2. a deadlock or stalemate situation in which no progress can be made
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter XIV:
      “It seems to me the thing's an impasse. French expression,” I explained, “meaning that we're stymied good and proper with no hope of finding a formula.”
    • 2010, Clare Vanderpool, Moon Over Manifest
      "Young man, this town is at a bit of an impasse. If you have any suggestion that might help, now would be the time to voice it."

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

  • impasse at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From im- +‎ passe.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.pɑs/
  • (file)

NounEdit

impasse f (plural impasses)

  1. stalemate, impasse (situation in which no progress can be made; not used in the chess sense of stalemate)
  2. dead-end; cul-de-sac (street)

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

impasse f (invariable)

  1. impasse, dead-end, deadlock, stalemate

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French impasse.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

impasse m (plural impasses)

  1. impasse (a situation in which no progress can be made)

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French impasse.

NounEdit

impasse m (plural impasses)

  1. impasse

Further readingEdit