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See also: Opposition

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French oposicion (whence French opposition), from Late Latin oppositiō, translating Ancient Greek ἀντίθεσις (antíthesis), from the past participle stem of classical Latin oppōnō (I set against).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɒpəˈzɪʃən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /apəˈzɪʃn̩/
  • (file)

NounEdit

opposition (plural oppositions)

  1. The action of opposing or of being in conflict.
    • 2013 August 10, “Can China clean up fast enough?”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      That worries the government, which fears that environmental activism could become the foundation for more general political opposition.
  2. An opposite or contrasting position.
  3. (astronomy) The apparent relative position of two celestial bodies when one is at an angle of 180 degrees from the other as seen from the Earth.
  4. (politics) A political party or movement opposed to the party or government in power.
  5. (law) In United States intellectual property law, a proceeding in which an interested party seeks to prevent the registration of a trademark or patent.
  6. (chess) A position in which the player on the move must yield with his king allowing his opponent to advance with his own king.
  7. (logic) The difference of quantity or quality between two propositions having the same subject and predicate.

AntonymsEdit

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}} to add them to the appropriate sense(s).

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

opposition

  1. Genitive singular form of oppositio.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from post-classical Latin oppositiō (translating Ancient Greek ἀντίθεσις (antíthesis)), from the past participle stem of classical Latin oppōnō (I set against).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

opposition f (plural oppositions)

  1. opposition

Further readingEdit