English

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Etymology

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Latin debilitatus, past participle of debilitare (to weaken, debilitate), from the adjective debilis (weak), from de- + habilis (able) (de- +‎ ability +‎ -ate).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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debilitate (third-person singular simple present debilitates, present participle debilitating, simple past and past participle debilitated)

  1. (transitive) To make feeble; to weaken.
    The American Dream suffered a debilitating effect after the subprime crisis.
    • 2015 March 12, Daniel Taylor, “Chelsea out of Champions League after Thiago Silva sends 10-man PSG through on away goals”, in The Guardian (London)[1]:
      Twice, they found themselves behind, seemingly on their way out, and on both occasions they absolutely refused to let their lack of numbers debilitate them.
    Synonyms: enervate, enfeeble, weaken
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Translations

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See also

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Further reading

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Interlingua

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Noun

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debilitate (plural debilitates)

  1. weakness

Italian

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Etymology 1

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Verb

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debilitate

  1. inflection of debilitare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Etymology 2

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Participle

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debilitate f pl

  1. feminine plural of debilitato

Latin

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Verb

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dēbilitāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of dēbilitō

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French débilité. Equivalent to debil +‎ -itate.

Noun

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debilitate f (plural debilități)

  1. debility

Declension

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Spanish

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Verb

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debilitate

  1. second-person singular voseo imperative of debilitar combined with te