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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English feble, from Anglo-Norman feble (weak, feeble) (compare French faible), from Latin flēbilis (tearful, mournful, lamentable).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

feeble (comparative feebler, superlative feeblest)

  1. Deficient in physical strength
    Though she appeared old and feeble, she could still throw a ball.
    • 2011 October 23, Tom Fordyce, “2011 Rugby World Cup final: New Zealand 8-7 France”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      France were transformed from the feeble, divided unit that had squeaked past Wales in the semi-final, their half-backs finding the corners with beautifully judged kicks from hand, the forwards making yards with every drive and a reorganised Kiwi line-out beginning to malfunction.
  2. Lacking force, vigor, or efficiency in action or expression; faint.
    That was a feeble excuse for an example.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

feeble (third-person singular simple present feebles, present participle feebling, simple past and past participle feebled)

  1. (obsolete) To make feeble; to enfeeble.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit