defendant

See also: défendant

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈfɛnd.ənt/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English defendaunt (defending; defending in a suit), borrowed from Old French defendant, present participle of defendre, from Latin dēfendere.

AdjectiveEdit

defendant (comparative more defendant, superlative most defendant)

  1. Serving, or suitable, for defense; defensive, defending.
    • c. 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act II, Scene 4,[1]
      Thus comes the English with full power upon us;
      And more than carefully it us concerns
      To answer royally in our defences.
      Therefore the Dukes of Berri and of Bretagne,
      Of Brabant and of Orleans, shall make forth,
      And you, Prince Dauphin, with all swift dispatch,
      To line and new repair our towns of war
      With men of courage and with means defendant;

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English defendaunt (defendant in a suit; defender), borrowed from Old French defendant, nominalisation of defendant; see above.

NounEdit

defendant (plural defendants)

  1. (law) In civil proceedings, the party responding to the complaint; one who is sued and called upon to make satisfaction for a wrong complained of by another.
  2. (law) In criminal proceedings, the accused.

AntonymsEdit

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LatinEdit

VerbEdit

dēfendant

  1. third-person plural present active subjunctive of dēfendō