diverse

See also: divèrse

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French divers, from Latin diversus (various, different), also written divorsus, past participle of diverto, divortere (to turn or go different ways, part, separate, divert); see divert.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /daɪˈvɜːs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /dɨ.ˈvɝs/, /daɪ.ˈvɝs/, /ˈdaɪ.vɚs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)s

AdjectiveEdit

diverse (comparative more diverse, superlative most diverse)

  1. Consisting of many different elements; various.
  2. Different; dissimilar; distinct; not the same
    • 1797?, Jonathan Edwards, A Dissertation Concerning Liberty and Necessity; containing remarks on the essays of Dr. Samuel West, and on the writings of several other authors, on those subjects.
      It must be observed concerning moral Inability, in each kind of it, that the word Inability is used in a sense very diverse from its original import.
    • 1876, Robert Browning, Bifurcation
      Our roads are diverse: farewell, love! said she.
    • 1998, Ken Shelton, Integrity at Work, page 42:
      This is what collectivism forgot — the freedom to be diverse, and the conception of each diverse individual being inherently of equal value and having open-ended potential for contribution.
    • 2013 May-June, Katrina G. Claw, “Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3:
      In plants, the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual.
  3. Capable of various forms; multiform.
    • 1641, Ben Jonson, Discoveries
      Eloquence is a great and diverse thing.
  4. Composed of people with a variety of different demographic characteristics in terms of, for example, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, etc., and having a sizeable representation of people that are minorities in a given area.
    • 2019 June 27, Lauren Gambino, “Democratic 2020 candidates clash on healthcare, immigration and economy in first debate”, in The Guardian[1]:
      The stage reflected the increasingly diverse Democratic party in which women and people of color are ascendent.
  5. (nonstandard, proscribed) Belonging to a minority group.
    Idris Elba was a diverse hire for the franchise
    • 2016 January 22, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences[2]:
      The Board’s goal is to commit to doubling the number of women and diverse members of the Academy by 2020.
    • 2018 November 17, Saturday Night Live, season 44, episode 6, Voter Fraud (cold open):
      Here to comment is diverse Congresswoman from Ohio [] Marcia Fudge.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

diverse (comparative more diverse, superlative most diverse)

  1. In different directions; diversely.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin diversus, via French divers

AdjectiveEdit

diverse

  1. various, sundry, miscellaneous, incidental.
    • han annoncerede under «diverse»
      • he inserted an ad in the "miscellaneous" section
    Synonyms: alle mulige, alskens, forskellige, forskelligartet
  2. Capable of various forms; multiform.

InflectionEdit

Inflection of diverse
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular diverse 2
Neuter singular diverse 2
Plural diverse 2
Definite attributive1 diverse
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diverse

  1. Inflected form of divers

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

diverse

  1. diversely

FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diverse

  1. feminine singular of divers

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diverse

  1. inflection of divers:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diverse

  1. Feminine plural of adjective diverso.

VerbEdit

diverse

  1. third-person singular past historic of divergere

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From dīversus (turned different ways)

AdverbEdit

dīversē (not comparable)

  1. in different directions; hither and thither
  2. (figuratively) variously

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French divers, from Latin diversus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdivərs/, /ˈdiːvərs/

AdjectiveEdit

diverse

  1. different, differing
  2. (collectively) distinct, unique; diverse
  3. various, varying
  4. strange, odd, unusual
  5. several, many
  6. unfriendly

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: diverse
  • Scots: diverse

ReferencesEdit

AdverbEdit

diverse

  1. differently; diversely
  2. variously

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin diversus, via French divers

AdjectiveEdit

diverse (indeclinable)

  1. diverse, various, sundry, miscellaneous.
    han annonserte under «diverse»
    he inserted an ad in the "miscellaneous" section
  2. Capable of various forms; multiform.

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin diversus, via French divers

AdjectiveEdit

diverse (indeclinable)

  1. diverse, various, sundry, miscellaneous.
  2. Capable of various forms; multiform.

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diverse (not comparable) (plural only)

  1. diverse, various, different