doctrina

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan doctrina, from Latin doctrīna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

doctrina f (plural doctrines)

  1. doctrine

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From doctor (teacher) +‎ -īna (feminine of -īnus).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

doctrīna f (genitive doctrīnae); first declension

  1. teaching, instruction
  2. doctrine
  3. learning, erudition

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative doctrīna doctrīnae
Genitive doctrīnae doctrīnārum
Dative doctrīnae doctrīnīs
Accusative doctrīnam doctrīnās
Ablative doctrīnā doctrīnīs
Vocative doctrīna doctrīnae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • doctrina in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • doctrina in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • doctrina in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • doctrina in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the origin, first beginnings of learning: incunabula doctrinae
    • to have a theoretical knowledge of a thing: ratione, doctrina (opp. usu) aliquid cognitum habere
    • to combine theory with practice: doctrinam ad usum adiungere
    • a man perfect in all branches of learning: vir omni doctrina eruditus
    • to be a man of great learning: doctrina abundare (De Or. 3. 16. 59)
    • to have received only a moderate education: a doctrina mediocriter instructum esse
    • sound knowledge; scholarship: doctrina exquisita, subtilis, elegans
    • profound erudition: doctrina recondita
    • to pass as a man of great learning: magnam doctrinae speciem prae se ferre
    • the usual subjects taught to boys: doctrinae, quibus aetas puerilis impertiri solet (Nep. Att. 1. 2)
    • Pythagoras' principles were widely propagated: Pythagorae doctrina longe lateque fluxit (Tusc. 4. 1. 2)
    • systematic, methodical knowledge: ratio et doctrina

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin doctrīna.

NounEdit

doctrina f (oblique plural doctrinas, nominative singular doctrina, nominative plural doctrinas)

  1. doctrine

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin doctrīna.

NounEdit

doctrina f (plural doctrinas)

  1. teaching
  2. doctrine

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit