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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin doctrina (teaching, instruction, learning, knowledge), from doctor (a teacher), from docere (to teach); see doctor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

doctrine (countable and uncountable, plural doctrines)

  1. (countable) A belief or tenet, especially about philosophical or theological matters.
    The incarnation is a basic doctrine of classical Christianity.
    The four noble truths summarise the main doctrines of Buddhism.
  2. (countable and uncountable) The body of teachings of an ideology, most often a religion, or of an ideological or religious leader, organization, group or text.
    What is the understanding of marriage and family in orthodox Marxist doctrine?
    • 1560, John Knox, An Answere to a Great Number of Blasphemous Cavillations Written by an Anabaptist, and aduersarie to Gods eternall Predestination, London: Thomas Charde, published 1591, page 95:
      This one thing do we (compelled by your blaſphemous accuſations) repeat oftener then we would: to the end that indifferent men may ſee what doctrine it is, which you ſo maliciouſly impugne.

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TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

doctrine f (plural doctrines, diminutive doctrinetje n)

  1. doctrine
    De doctrine stelt duidelijk dat... - The doctrine clearly states that...

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin doctrina, diminutive from doctus, taught, perfect passive participle of docere, teach

NounEdit

doctrine f (plural doctrines)

  1. doctrine

Further readingEdit