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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin doctrina (teaching, instruction, learning, knowledge), from doctor (a teacher), from docere (to teach); see doctor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

doctrine (countable and uncountable, plural doctrines)

  1. (countable) A belief or tenet, especially about philosophical or theological matters.
    The incarnation is a basic doctrine of classical Christianity.
    The four noble truths summarise the main doctrines of Buddhism.
  2. (countable and uncountable) The body of teachings of an ideology, most often a religion, or of an ideological or religious leader, organization, group or text.
    What is the understanding of marriage and family in orthodox Marxist doctrine?
    • 1560, John Knox, An Answere to a Great Number of Blasphemous Cavillations Written by an Anabaptist, and aduersarie to Gods eternall Predestination, London: Thomas Charde, published 1591, page 95:
      This one thing do we (compelled by your blaſphemous accuſations) repeat oftener then we would: to the end that indifferent men may ſee what doctrine it is, which you ſo maliciouſly impugne.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

doctrine f (plural doctrines, diminutive doctrinetje n)

  1. doctrine
    De doctrine stelt duidelijk dat...
    The doctrine clearly states that...

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin doctrina, diminutive from doctus, taught, perfect passive participle of docere, teach

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

doctrine f (plural doctrines)

  1. doctrine

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

doctrine

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of doctrinar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of doctrinar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of doctrinar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of doctrinar.