dolce far niente

EnglishEdit

 
Dolce Far Niente by John William Godward, 1897

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian dolce far niente (literally sweet doing nothing, sweet idleness).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌdɒltʃeɪ ˌfɑː nɪˈɛnteɪ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌdoʊltʃeɪ ˌfɑɹ niˈɛnteɪ/, /ˌdoʊltʃi ˌfɑɹ niˈɛnti/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnti
  • Hyphenation: dol‧ce far nien‧te

NounEdit

dolce far niente (uncountable)

  1. Sheer indulgent relaxation and blissful laziness, the enjoyment of idleness.
    • 1882, W.S. Gilbert, Iolanthe
      This gentleman is seen, / With a maid of seventeeen, / A-taking of his dolce far niente; / And wonders he'd achieve, / For he asks us to believe / She's his mother—and he's nearly five-and-twenty!
    • 1890, Collins, J.W., “Society proceedings of the Colorado State Medical Society”, in The Omaha Clinic[1], volume 3, number 5, page 131:
      We should so organize our rank and mobilize our forces that our influence may not be dissipated before the advancing hosts of quackery and ignorance. This we can do effectively if only the wise and successful ones among our leaders can be induced to forgo the dolce far niente of the noontime of their lives.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Literally “sweet doing nothing, sweet idleness”.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dolce far niente m (uncountable)

  1. dolce far niente (enjoyment of idleness)
    Synonym: ozio

Related termsEdit