See also: drágán and Dragan

Contents

IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowing from Old French dragon, from Latin dracō, from Ancient Greek δράκων(drákōn, a serpent of huge size, a python, a dragon), probably from δρακεῖν(drakeîn), aorist active infinitive of δέρκομαι(dérkomai, I see clearly).

NounEdit

dragan m ‎(genitive singular dragain, nominative plural dragain)

  1. dragon
    1. (figuratively) warrior
    2. dragon lizard (member of Agamidae)
  2. tarragon
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

dragan

  1. variant genitive singular of draig

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dragan dhragan ndragan
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish dragán, an English or Romance loanword, ultimately from Latin dracō, dracōnem, from Ancient Greek δράκων(drákōn, a serpent of huge size, a python, a dragon).

NounEdit

dragan m ‎(genitive singular dragan, plural draganyn)

  1. dragon

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dragan ghragan nragan
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old EnglishEdit

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *draganą, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰreǵ-(draw, pull, drag). Compare Old English draġan, Old Dutch dragan, Old Frisian draga, Old High German tragan, Old Norse draga, Gothic 𐌳𐍂𐌰𐌲𐌰𐌽(dragan).

VerbEdit

dragan

  1. to go, to travel

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /drǎɡan/
  • Hyphenation: dra‧gan

NounEdit

dràgan m ‎(Cyrillic spelling дра̀ган)

  1. (of a guy) sweetheart

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

dragan

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present indicative form of dragar.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present indicative form of dragar.