AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch drift, from Middle Dutch drift, from Old Dutch *drift, from Proto-Germanic *driftiz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drif (plural drifte)

  1. urge, strong desire
  2. fit of rage

Derived termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drif n (genitive singular drifs, nominative plural drif)

  1. driven snow
  2. spindrift, spoondrift, seaspray
  3. drive (motor that depends on a mechanism that stores potential energy for future use)
  4. (computing) drive

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English drift, from Middle English drift, dryft (act of driving, drove, shower of rain or snow, impulse), from Old English *drift (drift), from Proto-Germanic *driftiz (drift), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰreybʰ- (to drive, push).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈdrɪf]
  • Hyphenation: drif

NounEdit

drif (first-person possessive drifku, second-person possessive drifmu, third-person possessive drifnya)

  1. (mining, engineering) drift: a passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel.

Further readingEdit


PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch drijven.

VerbEdit

drif

  1. to float

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

drif

  1. imperative of drifva.

AnagramsEdit