dright

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English drihte, from Old English driht, dryht ‎(a multitude, an army, company, body of retainers, nation, a people, men), from Proto-Germanic *druhtiz ‎(troop, following), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrewgʰ- ‎(to hold, hold fast, support). Cognate with North Frisian dregte ‎(people, crowd, escort, retinue, host), Middle Low German drucht ‎(band, war-team), Middle High German truht ‎(multitude, offspring), Icelandic drótt ‎(people, entourage, bodyguard), Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐌳𐍂𐌰𐌿𐌷𐍄𐍃 ‎(gadrauhts, soldier). Related also to German Truchsess ‎(steward), from Middle High German truhtsæze ‎(chairman of a multitude, steward, literally sitting one/presider next to/in front of a multitude". The meaning "multitude" survives in present day German in the sense of "representing a court), from Old High German truhtsāzzo.

NounEdit

dright ‎(plural drights)

  1. (obsolete) A multitude; army; host.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English dright, driȝt, earlier drihten, from Old English dryhten ‎(a ruler, king, lord, prince, the supreme ruler, the Lord, God, Christ), from Proto-Germanic *druhtinaz ‎(leader, chief, lord), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrewgʰ- ‎(to hold, hold fast, support). Cognate with Scots drichtin, drichtine ‎(lord, the Lord), Old Frisian drochten ‎(lord), Old Saxon drohtin ‎(lord), Middle High German truhten, trohten ‎(ruler, lord), Danish drot ‎(king), Swedish drotten, drott ‎(king, ruler, sovereign), Icelandic drottinn ‎(lord, master, ruler, God), Finnish ruhtinas ‎(sovereign prince). Related also to Old English dryht ‎(a multitude, an army, company, body of retainers, nation, a people, men), Old English ġedryht ‎(fortune, fate), Old English drēogan ‎(to serve in the military, endure). More at dree.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dright ‎(plural drights)

  1. Alternative form of drighten
  2. A lord; ruler; chief; leader.
    • 2001, Diana Wynne Jones, The chronicles of Chrestomanci:
      "Hey, you!" Christopher called out in the most lordly way he could. "You there! Take me to the Dright at once!"
  3. (often capitalised) The Lord; The Lord God; Christ.
Derived termsEdit