duvet

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From French duvet, from Middle French, from Old French duvet (down, the feathers of young birds), alteration of dumet, dumect, from Old French dum, dun (down, feathers), from Old Norse dúnn (down, down feather), from Proto-Germanic *dūnaz (down), from Proto-Indo-European *dhūw- (to smoke, fume, raise dust). Cognate with Icelandic dúnn (down), Danish dun (down), German Daune (down). More at down.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

duvet (plural duvets)

  1. (UK, New Zealand) A thick, padded quilt used instead of blankets.
  2. (US) A cover for a quilt or comforter.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Old French duvet (down, the feathers of young birds), alteration of dumet, dumect, from Old French dum, dun (down, feathers), from Old Norse dúnn (down, down feather), from Proto-Germanic *dūnaz (down), from Proto-Indo-European *dhūw- (to smoke, fume, raise dust)[1]. Cognate with Danish dun (down), German Daune (down). More at down.

NounEdit

duvet m (plural duvets)

  1. (uncountable) down (soft, fine feathers)
  2. down, fuzz (on face, peach, etc)
  3. (down-filled) sleeping bag
  4. duvet, continental quilt
  5. (Belgium, Switzerland) eiderdown

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Le Robert pour tous, Dictionnaire de la langue française, Janvier 2004, p. 351, duvet

JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French duvet (down, the feathers of young birds), alteration of dumet, dumect, from Old French dum, dun (down, feathers), from Old Norse dúnn (down, down feather)

NounEdit

duvet m (plural duvets)

  1. duvet
Last modified on 20 April 2014, at 16:24