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EnglishEdit

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A duvet, without a cover

EtymologyEdit

From French duvet, from Middle French duvet, from Old French duvet ‎(down, the feathers of young birds), alteration of dumet, dumect, from Old French dum, dun ‎(down, feathers), from Old Norse dúnn ‎(down, down feather), from Proto-Germanic *dūnaz ‎(down), from Proto-Indo-European *dhūw- ‎(to smoke, fume, raise dust). Cognate with Icelandic dúnn ‎(down), Danish dun ‎(down), German Daune ‎(down). More at down.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

duvet ‎(plural duvets)

  1. (Britain, New Zealand) A thick, padded quilt used instead of blankets.
  2. (US) A cover for a quilt or comforter.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Old French duvet ‎(down, the feathers of young birds), alteration of dumet, dumect, from Old French dum, dun ‎(down, feathers), from Old Norse dúnn ‎(down, down feather), from Proto-Germanic *dūnaz ‎(down), from Proto-Indo-European *dhūw- ‎(to smoke, fume, raise dust)[1]. Cognate with Danish dun ‎(down), German Daune ‎(down). More at down.

NounEdit

duvet m ‎(plural duvets)

  1. (uncountable) down (soft, fine feathers)
  2. down, fuzz (on face, peach, etc)
  3. (down-filled) sleeping bag
  4. duvet, continental quilt
  5. (Belgium, Switzerland) eiderdown

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Le Robert pour tous, Dictionnaire de la langue française, Janvier 2004, p. 351, duvet

External linksEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French duvet ‎(down, the feathers of young birds), alteration of dumet, dumect, from Old French dum, dun ‎(down, feathers), from Old Norse dúnn ‎(down, down feather)

NounEdit

duvet m ‎(plural duvets)

  1. (Jersey) duvet
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