See also: Ermo

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese ermo, hermo, from Late Latin eremus, erēmus, from Ancient Greek ἔρημος (érēmos), with preservation of Greek accent over vowel length. Cognate with Portuguese ermo and Spanish yermo.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ermo m (feminine singular erma, masculine plural ermos, feminine plural ermas)

  1. uninhabited
    Synonym: deserto
  2. solitary, retired (far from other inhabited places, not easily accessed)
  3. uncultivated

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

ermo m (plural ermos)

  1. waste, wasteland, wilderness, desert
    Synonyms: deserto, vougo
  2. mold which grows in an empty cask and can affect the taste of wine

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ermo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • ermo” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • ermo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • ermo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • ermo” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin eremus, erēmus, from Ancient Greek ἔρημος (érēmos, lonely, solitary, desert, waste), with preservation of Greek accent over vowel length. Doublet of eremo.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈer.mo/, [ˈer̺mo], /ˈɛr.mo/, [ˈɛr̺mo]
  • Hyphenation: ér‧mo, èr‧mo

AdjectiveEdit

ermo (feminine singular erma, masculine plural ermi, feminine plural erme)

  1. abandoned, deserted, solitary
    • 1374, Francesco Petrarca, “Mentre che 'l cor dagli amorosi vermi”, in Il Canzoniere[1], Florence: Andrea Bettini, published 1858, lines 1-4, page 358:
      Mentre che 'l cor dagli amorosi vermi ¶ fu consumato, e 'n fiamma amorosa arse, ¶ di vaga fera le vestigia sparse ¶ cercai per poggi solitari ed ermi.
      While my heart was being consumed by loving worms, burned in loving fire, I searched for traces of a wandering creature through the solitary enclosing hills.
    • 1835, Giacomo Leopardi, “XII. L'infinito [The Infinite]”, in Canti[2], Bari: Einaudi, published 1917, lines 4-8, page 49:
      Sempre caro mi fu quest’ermo colle, ¶ e questa siepe, che da tanta parte ¶ dell’ultimo orizzonte il guardo esclude.
      Always dear to me was this solitary hill and this hedge, which, from so many parts of the far horizon, the sight excludes.
    • 1877, Giosuè Carducci, “Sogno d'estate [Summer Dream]”, in Poesie[3], Bologna: Nicola Zanichelli, published 1906, lines 29-31, page 910:
      Io guardava la madre, guardava pensoso il fratello, ¶ questi che or giace lungi su ’l poggio d’Arno fiorito, ¶ quella che dorme presso ne l’erma solenne Certosa;
      I looked at the mother, I pensively looked at the brother, the latter now lying on the flowering hillock of Arno, the former sleeping at the solitary charterhouse;
    • 1891, Giovanni Pascoli, “VII. Anniversario [Anniversary]”, in Myricae[4], Livorno: Raffaello Giusti, published 1905, lines 9-11, page 36:
      Non son felici, sappi, ma serene: ¶ il lor sorriso ha una tristezza pia: ¶ io le guardo ― o mia sola erma famiglia! ―
      Know that they are not happy, but serene: their smile has a pious sadness: I look at them ― oh, my lonely solitary family! ―
  2. (rare) Synonym of eremo: hermitage

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese ermo, hermo, from Late Latin eremus, erēmus, from Ancient Greek ἔρημος (érēmos), with preservation of Greek accent over vowel length. Compare Aromanian ermu

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ermo m (feminine singular erma, masculine plural ermos, feminine plural ermas, comparable)

  1. uninhabited
  2. solitary, retired (far from civilisation, not able to be easily seen or accessed)

NounEdit

ermo m (plural ermos)

  1. waste (desolate place)

See alsoEdit