CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

English fair

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fér

  1. fair (just, equitable)
    Antonym: nefér

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • fér in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • fér in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fér

  1. (intransitive) to have enough room (space), to find place, to fit (somewhere, into something: -ba/-be)
    Annyi csokoládét vehetsz, amennyi a tenyeredbe fér.Take as much chocolate as you can hold in your palm.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

Further readingEdit

  • fér in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *wegrom (grass), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *h₂weg- (increase, enlarge) via a sense ‘outgrowth’.[1] Cognate with Cornish gora and Welsh gwair (hay).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fér n (genitive féuir, nominative plural féra)

  1. grass

InflectionEdit

Neuter o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative férN férN férL, féra
Vocative férN férN férL, féra
Accusative férN férN férL, féra
Genitive féuirL fér férN
Dative féorL féraib féraib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: féar
  • Manx: faiyr
  • Scottish Gaelic: feur

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
fér ḟér fér
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 409