English

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Portuguese fazenda (farm). Doublet of hacienda and faena.

Noun

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fazenda (plural fazendas)

  1. A Brazilian plantation, often associated with slavery during the colonial period.
    • 1912, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World [], London, New York, N.Y.: Hodder and Stoughton, →OCLC:
      In his hospitable fazenda we spent our time until the day when we were empowered to open the letter of instructions given to us by Professor Challenger.

Translations

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French

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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fazenda f (plural fazendas)

  1. fazenda

Further reading

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Portuguese

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Fazenda de milho em São Paulo. — Maize farm in São Paulo.

Etymology

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From Old Galician-Portuguese fazenda, from Latin facienda, form of faciendus (which is to do), from faciō (do, make), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set). Cognate with Spanish hacienda.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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fazenda f (plural fazendas)

  1. farm (a place where agricultural activities take place)
    Synonyms: lavoura, quinta, chácara; see also Thesaurus:lavoura
  2. (economics) public finances
    Synonyms: verba, renda, finanças
    Ministério da FazendaMinistry of Public Finances
  3. a cloth
    Synonyms: tecido, pano

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Kadiwéu: bajeenda
  • Russian: фазенда (fazenda)

Further reading

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