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Printed prose followed by verses on the same page for illustration

EtymologyEdit

Used in English since 1330, from French prose, from Latin prōsa (straightforward) from the term prōsa ōrātiō (a straightforward speech- i.e. without the ornaments of verse). The term prōsa (straightforward) is a colloquial form of prorsa (straight forwards) which is the feminine form of prorsus (straight forwards), from Old Latin prōvorsus (moving straight ahead), from pro- (forward) + vorsus (turned), form of vertō (I turn). Compare verse.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prose (usually uncountable, plural proses)

  1. Language, particularly written language, not intended as poetry.
    Though known mostly for her prose, she also produced a small body of excellent poems.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost (1st ed)[1]:
      ...Or if Sion Hill
      Delight thee more, and Siloa's Brook that flow’d
      Faft by the Oracle of God; I thence
      Invoke thy aid to my adventrous Song,
      That with no middle flight intends to soar
      Above th’ Ionian Mounts while it pursues
      Things unattempted yet in Prose or Rhime...
  2. Language which evinces little imagination or animation; dull and commonplace discourse.
  3. (Roman Catholicism) A hymn with no regular meter, sometimes introduced into the Mass.
    • 1699, A new ecclesiastical history[3]:
      Proses are parts of the Office of the Mass which are sung just before the Gospel, upon great Festivals. The French also call those Rhythmical Hymns Proses, which are sung in their Offices in the Church of Rome, in which Rhime only, and not Quantity of Syllables, is observed.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

prose (third-person singular simple present proses, present participle prosing, simple past and past participle prosed)

  1. To write or repeat in a dull, tedious, or prosy way.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act I, Scene II, verses 189-190
      Pray, do not prose, good Ethelbert, but speak;
      What is your purpose?
    • 1896, Robert Smythe Hichens, The Folly of Eustace[4]:
      Already he felt himself near to being a celebrity. He had astonished Eton. That was a good beginning. Papa might prose, knowing, of course, nothing of the poetry of caricature, of the wild joys and the laurels that crown the whimsical. So while Mr. Lane hunted adjectives, and ran sad-sounding and damnatory substantives to earth, Eustace hugged himself, and secretly chuckled over his pilgrim's progress towards the pages of Vanity Fair.


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ prose” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin prōsa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prose f (plural proses)

  1. prose

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

prose

  1. inflection of proser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

prose f

  1. plural of prosa

AnagramsEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

 
proseta

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *porsę.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈprɔsɛ/, [ˈprɔsə]

NounEdit

prose n (genitive proseśa, dual proseśi, plural proseta)

  1. piglet

DeclensionEdit