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See also: Furia and fúria

Contents

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin furia, whence also Italian foia (an inherited doublet).

NounEdit

furia f (plural furie)

  1. fury, anger, rage
  2. hurry, rush

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From furō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

furia f (genitive furiae); first declension

  1. rage, fury, frenzy

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative furia furiae
genitive furiae furiārum
dative furiae furiīs
accusative furiam furiās
ablative furiā furiīs
vocative furia furiae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • furia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • furia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “furia”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • furia” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be tormented by remorse: (mens scelerum furiis agitatur)
    • the Furies harass and torment some one: Furiae agitant et vexant aliquem

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

furia f

  1. fury, rage

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin furia.

NounEdit

furia f (plural furias)

  1. fury
  2. rage
  3. Fury