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See also: Ira, Irã, IRA, irá, -irà, īra, and īrā

Contents

BasqueEdit

NounEdit

ira

  1. fern

ChuukeseEdit

NounEdit

ira

  1. tree

FatalukuEdit

NounEdit

ira

  1. water

Further readingEdit


FijianEdit

PronounEdit

ira

  1. they (five or more)

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ira

  1. third-person singular future of aller

AnagramsEdit


GunyaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Proto-Pama-Nyungan *rirra.

NounEdit

ira

  1. tooth

Further readingEdit

  • Barry Alpher, Proto-Pama-Nyungan etyma, in Claire Bowern, Harold James Koch, Australian Languages: Classification and the Comparative Method (2004, ISBN 9027247617

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ira

  1. future of ir

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Latin īra

NounEdit

ira f (plural ire)

  1. anger, ire, wrath

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier eira (Plautus), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eys- (compare Ancient Greek οἶστρος (oîstros), Lithuanian aistrà (violent passion), Avestan 𐬀𐬉𐬴𐬨𐬀 (aēṣ̌ma, anger)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

īra f (genitive īrae); first declension

  1. ire, anger, wrath
    Dies irae.
    Day of wrath.

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative īra īrae
genitive īrae īrārum
dative īrae īrīs
accusative īram īrās
ablative īrā īrīs
vocative īra īrae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ira in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “ira”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be fired with rage: ira incensum esse
    • to be fired with rage: ira ardere (Flacc. 35. 88)
    • his anger cools: ira defervescit (Tusc. 4. 36. 78)
    • to vent one's anger, spite on some one: iram in aliquem effundere
    • to vent one's anger, spite on some one: iram, bilem evomere in aliquem
    • to give free play to one's anger: irae indulgere (Liv. 23. 3)
    • to be short-tempered; to be prone to anger: praecipitem in iram esse (Liv. 23. 7)
    • to calm one's anger: iram restinguere, sedare
  • ira in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]
  • ira in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ira in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

MakaleroEdit

NounEdit

ira

  1. water

Further readingEdit


MakasaeEdit

NounEdit

ira

  1. water

Further readingEdit

  • Juliette Huber, First steps towards a grammar of Makasae: a language of East Timor (2008)
  • A. Schapper, J. Huber, A. van Engelenhoven, The Historical Relation of the Papuan Languages of Timor and Kisar, Language and Linguistics in Melnesia, Special Issue : On the History, Contact and Classification of Papuan languages (2012) pp. 194-242

OirataEdit

NounEdit

ira

  1. water

Further readingEdit


Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hiz.

PronounEdit

ira

  1. her

DeclensionEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese ira, from Latin ira, from Proto-Indo-European *eis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ira f (plural iras)

  1. anger, rage (a strong feeling of displeasure, hostility or antagonism towards someone or something)

VerbEdit

ira

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of irar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of irar

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin īra

NounEdit

ira f (plural iras)

  1. ire, wrath

Derived termsEdit