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FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French giembre, inherited from Latin gemere, present active infinitive of gemō. Doublet of gémir.

VerbEdit

geindre

  1. to moan, groan
    Synonyms: gémir, lamenter
ConjugationEdit

This verb is conjugated like peindre. It uses the same endings as rendre or vendre, but its -nd- becomes -gn- before a vowel, and its past participle ends in ‘t’ instead of a vowel.

Etymology 2Edit

From the Old French joindre, gaindre (nominative/subjective case), inherited from Vulgar Latin *jŭnior, from Latin iūnior, jūnior (nominative). Also a doublet of junior, borrowed later from the Latin word's accusative form (whence also the Old French oblique case gignor was inherited).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

geindre m (plural geindres)

  1. (obsolete) a worker who kneads dough in a bakery

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French giembre, from Latin gemō, gemere.

VerbEdit

geindre

  1. (Jersey) to moan