See also: Gnat

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English gnat, from Old English gnætt (gnat; midge; mosquito), from Proto-West Germanic *gnatt, *gnattu, from Proto-Germanic *gnattaz, *gnattuz (gnat), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰneHdʰn-, *gʰneHd- (to gnaw; scratch), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰen- (to gnaw; bite; scratch; grind). Cognate with Low German Gnatte (gnat), dialectal Swedish gnatt (mote; particle; atom), German Gnatz (scabs; rash; scabies; stinginess). Related also gnit and gnaw.

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /næt/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æt

NounEdit

gnat (plural gnats)

  1. Any small insect of the order Diptera, specifically within the suborder Nematocera.
  2. (informal) An annoying person.
    • 1971, Richard Carpenter, Catweazle and the Magic Zodiac, Harmondsworth: Puffin Books, page 115:
      "Away thou whining gnat, and trouble me not!"

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English gnætt, from Proto-Germanic *gnattaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gnat (plural gnattes)

  1. A gnat or similar insect.
  2. Something of little worth or importance.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: gnat
  • Scots: gnat

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *gnatъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gnat m anim (diminutive gnacik)

  1. (colloquial) large bone
  2. (slang) gun

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • gnat in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gnat in Polish dictionaries at PWN