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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tæŋ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋ

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tang (serpent's tongue", "extension of blade), from Old Norse tangi (pointed metal tool), perhaps related to Old Norse tunga (tongue). But see also Old Dutch tanger (sharp", "tart", "pinching)

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

NounEdit

tang (plural tangs)

  1. (obsolete) tongue
    • 1667, John Lacy, Sauny the Scot: Or, the Taming of the Shrew, Act V,
      Sauny Hear ye, sir; could not ye mistake, and pull her tang out instead of her teeth?
  2. A refreshingly sharp aroma or flavor
    • 1904, O. Henry, "The Missing Chord"
      The miraculous air, heady with ozone and made memorably sweet by leagues of wild flowerets, gave tang and savour to the breath.
  3. A strong or offensive taste; especially, a taste of something extraneous to the thing itself.
    Wine or cider has a tang of the cask.
  4. (figuratively) A sharp, specific flavor or tinge
    • Fuller
      Such proceedings had a strong tang of tyranny.
    • Jeffrey
      a cant of philosophism, and a tang of party politics
    • 1913, Paul Laurence Dunbar, "At Sunset Time"
      What, was it I who bared my heart / Through unrelenting years, / And knew the sting of misery's dart, / The tang of sorrow's tears?
  5. A projecting part of an object by means of which it is secured to a handle, or to some other part.
  6. The part of a knife, fork, file, or other small instrument, which is inserted into the handle
  7. The projecting part of the breech of a musket barrel, by which the barrel is secured to the stock
  8. The part of a sword blade to which the handle is fastened
  9. Anything resembling a tongue in form or position such as the tongue of a buckle.
  10. A group of saltwater fish from the Acanthuridae family, especially the Zebrasoma genus, also known as the surgeonfish.
  11. (shuffleboard) A shuffleboard paddle.
SynonymsEdit
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AntonymsEdit
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Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

imitative

NounEdit

tang (plural tangs)

  1. A sharp, twanging sound; an unpleasant tone; a twang

VerbEdit

tang (third-person singular simple present tangs, present participle tanging, simple past and past participle tanged)

  1. (dated, beekeeping) To strike two metal objects together loudly in order to persuade a swarm of honeybees to land so it may be captured by the beekeeper.[1][2]
  2. To make a ringing sound; to ring.
    Let thy tongue tang arguments of state. — Shakespeare.

Etymology 3Edit

Probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish tang (seaweed), Swedish tång, Icelandic þang

NounEdit

tang (plural tangs)

  1. (rare) knotted wrack, Ascophyllum nodosum (coarse blackish seaweed)

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From poontang by shortening

NounEdit

tang (plural tangs)

  1. (vulgar slang) The vagina
    • 2002, Lynn Breedlove, Godspeed, St. Martin's Griffin, →ISBN, page 9,
      The guys like to look at her tang, because that's how they are []
  2. (vulgar slang) intercourse with a woman

ReferencesEdit

  • tang at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • tang in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  1. ^ Eva Crane, The World History of Beekeeping and Honey Hunting, Taylor & Francis (1999), →ISBN, page 239.
  2. ^ Hilda M. Ransome, The Sacred Bee in Ancient Times and Folklore, Courier Dover Publications (2004), →ISBN, page 225.

AnagramsEdit


BlagarEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tang

  1. sea

ReferencesEdit


DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse tǫng.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tanɡ/, [tˢɑŋˀ]

NounEdit

tang c (singular definite tangen, plural indefinite tænger)

  1. tongs
  2. forceps
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse þang.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tanɡ/, [tˢɑŋˀ]

NounEdit

tang c (singular definite tangen, not used in plural form)

  1. seaweed

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch tanghe, from Old Dutch tanga, from Proto-Germanic *tangō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tang f (plural tangen, diminutive tangetje n)

  1. pliers
  2. tongs
  3. (especially the diminutive) pincers, tweezers
  4. (figuratively) shrew, bitch

Derived termsEdit


EstonianEdit

NounEdit

tang (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. groat

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


KriolEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English tongue.

NounEdit

tang

  1. tongue

KurdishEdit

NounEdit

tang ?

  1. side

KusundaEdit

NounEdit

tang

  1. water

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

tang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of tāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of táng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of tǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of tàng.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mauritian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malagasy tandraka

NounEdit

tang

  1. tenrec

ReferencesEdit

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse tǫng

NounEdit

tang f or m (definite singular tanga or tangen, indefinite plural tenger, definite plural tengene)

  1. (a pair of) pliers, pincers
  2. (a pair of) forceps
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse þang, compare with German Tang

NounEdit

tang m or n (definite singular tangen or tanget, uncountable)

  1. kelp, seaweed (order Fucales)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þang

NounEdit

tang m or n (definite singular tangen or tanget, uncountable)

  1. kelp, seaweed (order Fucales)

ReferencesEdit


Seychellois CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malagasy tandraka

NounEdit

tang

  1. tenrec

ReferencesEdit

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol - Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois - Français

Tok PisinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English tongue.

NounEdit

tang

  1. tongue

Etymology 2Edit

From English tank.

NounEdit

tang

  1. tank

Torres Strait CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English tongue.

NounEdit

tang

  1. (anatomy) tongue

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Sino-Vietnamese word from .

NounEdit

tang

  1. (formal) funeral

Etymology 2Edit

From English tangent.

NounEdit

tang

  1. (trigonometry) tangent

See alsoEdit