EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tæŋ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋ

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tange, variant of tonge (tongs, fang), from Old Norse tangi (pointed metal tool), perhaps related to Old Norse tunga (tongue). But see also Old Dutch tanger (sharp, tart, pinching)

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

NounEdit

tang (plural tangs)

  1. A refreshingly sharp aroma or flavor.
    Synonyms: bite, piquancy, spiciness
    Antonyms: blandness, dullness
    • 1904, O. Henry, "The Missing Chord"
      The miraculous air, heady with ozone and made memorably sweet by leagues of wild flowerets, gave tang and savour to the breath.
  2. A strong or offensive taste; especially, a taste of something extraneous to the thing itself.
    Wine or cider has a tang of the cask.
  3. (figuratively) A sharp, specific flavor or tinge.
  4. A projecting part of an object by means of which it is secured to a handle, or to some other part.
  5. The part of a knife, fork, file, or other small instrument, which is inserted into the handle.
  6. (firearms) The projecting part of the breech of a musket barrel, by which the barrel is secured to the stock.
  7. The part of a sword blade to which the handle is fastened.
  8. (zoology) A group of saltwater fish from the Acanthuridae family, especially the Zebrasoma genus.
    Synonym: surgeonfish
  9. (games) A shuffleboard paddle.
    Coordinate term: biscuit
  10. (obsolete) tongue
    • 1667, John Lacy, Sauny the Scot: Or, the Taming of the Shrew, Act V,
      Sauny Hear ye, sir; could not ye mistake, and pull her tang out instead of her teeth?
  11. (by extension) Anything resembling a tongue in form or position such as the tongue of a buckle.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

Imitative

NounEdit

tang (plural tangs)

  1. A sharp, twanging sound; an unpleasant tone; a twang.

VerbEdit

tang (third-person singular simple present tangs, present participle tanging, simple past and past participle tanged)

  1. (dated, beekeeping) To strike two metal objects together loudly in order to persuade a swarm of honeybees to land so it may be captured by the beekeeper.[1][2]
  2. To make a ringing sound; to ring.

Etymology 3Edit

Probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish tang (seaweed), Swedish tång, Icelandic þang

NounEdit

tang (plural tangs)

  1. (rare) knotted wrack, Ascophyllum nodosum (coarse blackish seaweed)

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Clipping of poontang.

NounEdit

tang (plural tangs)

  1. (vulgar slang) The vagina.
    • 2002, Lynn Breedlove, Godspeed, St. Martin's Griffin, →ISBN, page 9,
      The guys like to look at her tang, because that's how they are []
  2. (vulgar slang) intercourse with a woman

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Eva Crane, The World History of Beekeeping and Honey Hunting, Taylor & Francis (1999), →ISBN, page 239.
  2. ^ Hilda M. Ransome, The Sacred Bee in Ancient Times and Folklore, Courier Dover Publications (2004), →ISBN, page 225.

AnagramsEdit


BlagarEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tang

  1. sea

ReferencesEdit


CimbrianEdit

NounEdit

tang

  1. plural of tage

DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse tǫng.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tanɡ/, [tˢɑŋˀ]

NounEdit

tang c (singular definite tangen, plural indefinite tænger)

  1. tongs
  2. forceps
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse þang.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tanɡ/, [tˢɑŋˀ]

NounEdit

tang c (singular definite tangen, not used in plural form)

  1. seaweed

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch tanghe, from Old Dutch tanga, from Proto-Germanic *tangō, *tangiz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tang f (plural tangen, diminutive tangetje n)

  1. pliers
  2. tongs
  3. (especially the diminutive) pincers, tweezers
  4. (figuratively) shrew, bitch

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Indonesian: tang

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

tang (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. groat

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Further readingEdit

  • tang in Eesti keele seletav sõnaraamat

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch tang, from Middle Dutch tanghe, from Old Dutch tanga, from Proto-Germanic *tangō.

NounEdit

tang (first-person possessive tangku, second-person possessive tangmu, third-person possessive tangnya)

  1. pliers

VerbEdit

tang

  1. to use the pliers

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic.

NounEdit

tang (first-person possessive tangku, second-person possessive tangmu, third-person possessive tangnya)

  1. the sound of hit can, a metallic sound.

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

tang (first-person possessive tangku, second-person possessive tangmu, third-person possessive tangnya)

  1. Nonstandard form of tank.

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

tang

  1. (colloquial) Clipping of tentang.

Further readingEdit


KriolEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English tongue.

NounEdit

tang

  1. tongue

KusundaEdit

NounEdit

tang

  1. water

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

tang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of tāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of táng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of tǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of tàng.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mauritian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malagasy tandraka

NounEdit

tang

  1. tenrec

ReferencesEdit

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

tang

  1. Alternative form of tonge (tongs)

Min NanEdit

For pronunciation and definitions of tang – see (“east; host; etc.”).
(This character, tang, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of .)

Northern KurdishEdit

NounEdit

tang ?

  1. side

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse tǫng

NounEdit

tang f or m (definite singular tanga or tangen, indefinite plural tenger, definite plural tengene)

  1. (a pair of) pliers, pincers
  2. (a pair of) forceps
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse þang, compare with German Tang

NounEdit

tang m or n (definite singular tangen or tanget, uncountable)

  1. kelp, seaweed (order Fucales)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þang n.

NounEdit

tang m (definite singular tangen, uncountable)

  1. kelp, seaweed (order Fucales)

Usage notesEdit

  • Prior to a 2019 revision, it was also considered grammatically neuter.[1] With this change, definite singular tanget was made non-standard.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Language Council of Norway, Spelling decisions since 2012 (in Norwegian, retrieved 12.21.20)

PhaluraEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Urdu تنگ(taṅg), from Persian [Term?].

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tang (invariable, Perso-Arabic spelling تنگ)

  1. narrow
  2. troubled

ReferencesEdit

  • Liljegren, Henrik; Haider, Naseem (2011) Palula Vocabulary (FLI Language and Culture Series; 7)‎[1], Islamabad, Pakistan: Forum for Language Initiatives, →ISBN

Seychellois CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malagasy tandraka

NounEdit

tang

  1. tenrec

ReferencesEdit

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol - Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois - Français

Tai DoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Thai ทาง (taang), Lao ທາງ (thāng), Northern Thai ᨴᩤ᩠ᨦ, ᦑᦱᧂ (taang), Shan တၢင်း (táang).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tang

  1. road, path, way

Tok PisinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English tongue.

NounEdit

tang

  1. tongue

Etymology 2Edit

From English tank.

NounEdit

tang

  1. tank

Torres Strait CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English tongue.

NounEdit

tang

  1. (anatomy) tongue

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Sino-Vietnamese word from .

NounEdit

tang

 
Vietnamese funeral flag (cờ tang)
  1. a series of events that encompasses a funeral, a burial or cremation, and a period of mourning spanning up to 3 years after the lunar date of death
    để tang
    to hold a public funeral, then stay in mourning (by watching your clothing choices and avoiding other taboos)
    đại tang
    mourning in 3 years
    (literally, “greater mourning”)
    tiểu tang
    mourning in 1 year or less
    (literally, “lesser mourning”)
    mãn/xả tang
    to officially end mourning
    hết tang
    the mourning (has) ended
    đám tang
    a funeral
    Nhà đang có tang.
    The family is in mourning.
    Chưa hết tang mẹ.
    They haven't officially ended mourning their mother.
    đeo băng tang
    to wear a funeral headband
    đội khăn tang
    to wear a funeral headscarf
Derived termsEdit
Derived terms

Etymology 2Edit

From English tangent.

NounEdit

tang

  1. (trigonometry) tangent

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

tang

  1. (music) shell (body of a drum)
    Trống thủng còn tang.
    The drum was busted, leaving only the shell.

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

tang

  1. (fossil word) evidence of wrongdoing
    Đốt đi cho mất tang.
    Light it on fire to hide the evidence.
Usage notesEdit

This sense only occurs in some compound words.

Derived termsEdit
Derived terms

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

tang

  1. (informal) something or someone insignificant
    Cái tang thuốc này hút nặng lắm.
    Smoking this little thing packs a punch.
    Tang ấy thì biết làm ăn gì.
    That guy hasn't a clue how to make a living.

Etymology 6Edit

Sino-Vietnamese word from

NounEdit

tang

  1. (fossil word) mulberry
  2. (fossil word) silkworm
Usage notesEdit

This sense only occurs in some compound words.

Derived termsEdit
Derived terms

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit