DanishEdit

NounEdit

grever c

  1. indefinite plural of greve

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French grever, borrowed from Latin gravō, gravāre (with influence from Vulgar Latin grevis (cf. grief), from gravis (heavy)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

grever

  1. (transitive) to burden; put a burden on
  2. (transitive, figuratively) to put a weight on (someone's shoulders)
  3. (transitive) to hang over; weigh heavy over

ConjugationEdit

This verb is conjugated mostly like the regular -er verbs (parler and chanter and so on), but the -e- /ə/ of the second-to-last syllable becomes -è- /ɛ/ when the next vowel is a silent or schwa -e-. For example, in the third-person singular present indicative, we have il grève rather than *il greve. Other verbs conjugated this way include lever and mener. Related but distinct conjugations include those of appeler and préférer.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

grever m

  1. indefinite plural of greve

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin gravāre, present active infinitive of gravō (I make heavier), with influence from Vulgar Latin grevis (cf. grief).

VerbEdit

grever

  1. to weigh down; to make heavier
  2. to burden; to overwhelm with burden
  3. to irritate; to bother; to annoy

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-v, *-vs, *-vt are modified to f, s, t. This verb has a stressed present stem griev distinct from the unstressed stem grev. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: grieve
  • French: grever