irritate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin irrītātus, past participle of irrītō (excite, irritate, incite, stimulate).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪɹ.ɪˌteɪt/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

irritate (third-person singular simple present irritates, present participle irritating, simple past and past participle irritated)

  1. (transitive) To provoke impatience, anger, or displeasure in.
    • 1814, Signor Vestris, La Didone Abbandonata, a Serious Opera, in Two Acts. Altered from Metastasio, by Signor Vestris. As Represented at the King’s Theatre, in the Hay-Market., London: [] J. Gillet, [], page 15:
      If thou irritatest my lord, there will come to war against thee all the Getulians, Numidians, and Garamantes, Afric contains.
    • 1896, Ernest Rénan, Eleanor Grant Vickery, transl., Caliban: A Philosophical Drama Continuing “The Tempest” of William Shakespeare (Publications of The Shakespeare Society of New York; No. 9), New York, N.Y.: The Shakespeare Press; London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., Ltd., page 19:
      Thou scandalizest me and irritatest my nature as much as it possibly can be irritated.
    • 1913, Mrs. [Marie] Belloc Lowndes, chapter I, in The Lodger, London: Methuen, OCLC 7780546; republished in Novels of Mystery: The Lodger; The Story of Ivy; What Really Happened, New York, N.Y.: Longmans, Green and Co., [], [1933], OCLC 2666860, page 10:
      Thanks to that penny he had just spent so recklessly [on a newspaper] he would pass a happy hour, taken, for once, out of his anxious, despondent, miserable self. It irritated him shrewdly to know that these moments of respite from carking care would not be shared with his poor wife, with careworn, troubled Ellen.
  2. (intransitive) To cause or induce displeasure or irritation.
  3. (transitive) To induce pain in (all or part of a body or organism).
  4. (transitive, obsolete, Scotland, law) To render null and void.
    • c. 1634-1661 John Bramhall, Protestants' Ordination Defended
      Are human laws presently superfluous, so often as they do not irritate or abrogate Divine laws ?

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

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ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

irritate

  1. feminine plural of irritato

ParticipleEdit

irritate f pl

  1. feminine plural of irritato

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

irritate

  1. inflection of irritare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

irrītāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of irrītō

ReferencesEdit

  • irritate”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • irritate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette