EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English grom, from Old English grom, gram (angry, wrathful), from Proto-Germanic *gramaz (angry, bearing a grudge), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrem- (to thunder, rub, tear, scratch). Probably influenced in form by glum. Compare also Danish grum (cruel, atrocious, fell), Swedish grym (cruel, furious, terrible). See also grim, gram, grump.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

grum (comparative grummer, superlative grummest)

  1. Morose, stern, surly, sullen.
    • 1836, Joanna Baillie, The Stripling, Act 2
      Look not so grum at me; there is something to make thee more cheerful. (Offering him money with one hand, while he receives the bag with the other.)
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger Poeple's" Country, Nebraska 2005, p. 58:
      She cast a speculative look upon her husband, silent and grum as if he had been thus gruffly carved out of wood.
  2. Low, deep in the throat; guttural
    a grum voice

SynonymsEdit

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CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English groom.

NounEdit

grum m (plural grums)

  1. bellhop
    Synonyms: mosso d'equipatge, mosso de pista

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin grūmus (small heap).

NounEdit

grum m (plural grums)

  1. Beeswax bleached white from exposure to sunlight.
    Synonym: cera de grum
  2. lump
    Synonym: grumoll
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin grumus, from Proto-Indo-European *gar-, *ger- (to tie, bind together)

NounEdit

grum n (plural grumuri)

  1. (obsolete) pile, bundle, heap

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit