See also: Gram, grām, gräm, gram., -gram, and 'gram

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French gramme, from Ancient Greek γράμμα (grámma, a small weight, a scruple). Doublet of gramma.

NounEdit

gram (plural grams)

  1. A unit of mass equal to one-thousandth of a kilogram. Symbol: g.
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From obsolete Portuguese gram (modern Portuguese grão), from Latin grānum.[1] Doublet of grain.

NounEdit

gram (uncountable)

  1. A leguminous plant grown for its seeds, especially the chickpea.
  2. (uncountable) The seeds of these plants.
Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Diminutive of grandmother.

NounEdit

gram (plural grams)

  1. Grandmother.

Etymology 4Edit

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɡɹeəm/, /ˈɡɹæm/

NounEdit

gram (uncountable)

  1. (US) Misspelling of graham.

Etymology 6Edit

Clipping of Instagram.

NounEdit

gram (plural grams)

  1. (colloquial) Alternative form of 'gram

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary. 1976. pp. 566

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French gramme.

NounEdit

gram m (plural grams)

  1. gram (unit of mass)

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin grāmen. Previously applied to grasses in general but now restricted to a few specific species.

NounEdit

gram m (plural grams)

  1. Bermuda grass
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡram]
  • Hyphenation: gram
  • Rhymes: -am

NounEdit

gram m inan

  1. gram (unit)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • gram in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • gram in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse gramr, cognates with the Icelandic gramur (resentful, irritated).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡram/, [ɡ̊ʁɑmˀ]

AdjectiveEdit

gram

  1. irate

InflectionEdit

Inflection of gram
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular gram 2
Neuter singular gramt 2
Plural gramme 2
Definite attributive1 gramme
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Ancient Greek γραμμά (grammá).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡram/, [ɡ̊ʁɑmˀ]

NounEdit

gram n (singular definite grammet, plural indefinite gram)

  1. gram (unit of mass)
InflectionEdit

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French gramme, a borrowing from Latin gramma during the French Revolution, from Ancient Greek γράμμα (grámma).

NounEdit

gram n or m (plural grammen, diminutive grammetje n)

  1. gram (unit of mass)
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Indonesian: gram
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch gram (wrath).

AdjectiveEdit

gram (comparative grammer, superlative gramst)

  1. (rare) angry, irate

Etymology 3Edit

Substantivization of the adjective above.

NounEdit

gram m (uncountable, diminutive grammetje n)

  1. (rare) wrath
See alsoEdit

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German gram, from Old High German gram, from Proto-Germanic *gramaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gram (not comparable)

  1. angry

Further readingEdit

  • gram” in Duden online

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch gram, from French gramme, from Latin gramma, from Ancient Greek γράμμα (grámma).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡram]
  • Hyphenation: gram

NounEdit

gram (first-person possessive gramku, second-person possessive grammu, third-person possessive gramnya)

  1. gram: a unit of mass equal to one-thousandth of a kilogram. Symbol: g.

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French gramme, from Ancient Greek γράμμα (grámma, a small weight, a scruple).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gram m (genitive singular graim, nominative plural graim)

  1. gram (unit of mass)

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gram ghram ngram
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *gram, from Proto-Germanic *gramaz.

AdjectiveEdit

gram

  1. angry
  2. sad, upset

InflectionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Old English gram, from Proto-Germanic *gramaz; cognate to Old Norse gramr. Related to grim.

AdjectiveEdit

gram

  1. Angry.
    • c. 1300, Havelok the Dane:
      For he knew, the swike dam, / Euerildel God was him gram.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From French gramme, from Ancient Greek γράμμα (grámma)

NounEdit

gram n (definite singular grammet, indefinite plural gram, definite plural gramma or grammene)

  1. a gram, unit of weight, symbol g.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From French gramme, from Ancient Greek γράμμα (grámma)

NounEdit

gram n (definite singular grammet, indefinite plural gram, definite plural gramma)

  1. a gram, unit of weight, symbol g.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gramaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gram

  1. angry, hostile

DeclensionEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French gramme, a borrowing from Latin gramma, from Ancient Greek γράμμα (grámma).

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

gram m inan

  1. gram (unit of mass)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

gram

  1. first-person singular present indicative of grać

Further readingEdit

  • gram in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

gram m (plural grãos)

  1. Obsolete spelling of grão

DescendantsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gram

  1. Obsolete spelling of grão

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French gramme.

NounEdit

gram n (plural grame)

  1. gram (unit of mass)

DeclensionEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French gramme, from Ancient Greek γράμμα (grámma).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gram m (plural gramichean)

  1. gram (unit of mass)

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
gram ghram
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • gram” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French gramme, a borrowing from Latin gramma, from Ancient Greek γράμμα (grámma).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

grȁm m (Cyrillic spelling гра̏м)

  1. gram (unit)

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gram n

  1. gram (unit of mass)

TatarEdit

NounEdit

gram

  1. Latin spelling of грам (gram, gram (unit of mass))

DeclensionEdit


VolapükEdit

NounEdit

gram (nominative plural grams)

  1. gram

DeclensionEdit