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See also: bündle

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bundel, from Middle Dutch bondel or Old English byndele, byndelle (a binding; tying; fastening with bands); both from Proto-Germanic *bundil-, derivative of *bundą (bundle). Compare also English bindle.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌnd(ə)l/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: bun‧dle
  • Rhymes: -ʌndəl

NounEdit

bundle (plural bundles)

  1. A group of objects held together by wrapping or tying.
    a bundle of straw or of paper; a bundle of old clothes
    • Goldsmith
      The fable of the rods, which, when united in a bundle, no strength could bend.
  2. A package wrapped or tied up for carrying.
  3. (informal) A large amount, especially of money.
    The inventor of that gizmo must have made a bundle.
  4. (biology) A cluster of closely bound muscle or nerve fibres.
  5. (linguistics, education) A sequence of two or more words that occur in language with high frequency but are not idiomatic; a chunk, cluster, or lexical bundle.
    examples of bundles would include "in accordance with", "the results of" and "so far"
  6. (computing, Mac OS X) A directory containing related resources such as source code; application bundle.
  7. A quantity of paper equal to 2 reams (1000 sheets).
  8. (law) A court bundle, the assemblage of documentation prepared for, and referred to during, a court case.
  9. (mathematics) Topological space composed of a base space and fibers projected to the base space.

HyponymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

VerbEdit

bundle (third-person singular simple present bundles, present participle bundling, simple past and past participle bundled)

  1. (transitive) To tie or wrap together into a bundle.
  2. (transitive) To hustle; to dispatch something or someone quickly.
    • T. Hook
      They unmercifully bundled me and my gallant second into our own hackney coach.
  3. (intransitive) To prepare for departure; to set off in a hurry or without ceremony; used with away, off, out.
  4. (transitive) To dress someone warmly.
  5. (intransitive) To dress warmly. Usually bundle up
  6. (computing) To sell hardware and software as a single product.
  7. (intransitive) To hurry.
  8. (slang) Synonym of dogpile: to form a pile of people upon a victim.
  9. (transitive) To hastily or clumsily push, put, carry or otherwise send something into a particular place.
    • 2010 December 29, Chris Whyatt, “Chelsea 1 - 0 Bolton”, in BBC[1]:
      At the other end, Essien thought he had bundled the ball over the line in between Bolton's final two substitutions but the flag had already gone up.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 7
      Yes, there is death in this business of whaling—a speechlessly quick chaotic bundling of a man into Eternity.
    • 1859, Terence, Comedies of Terence
      Why, I didn't know that she meant that, until the Captain gave me an explanation, because I was dull of comprehension ; for he bundled me out of the house.
  10. (dated, intransitive) To sleep on the same bed without undressing.
    • Washington Irving
      Van Corlear stopped occasionally in the villages to eat pumpkin pies, dance at country frolics, and bundle with the Yankee lasses.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit