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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹɪm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English grim, from Old English grim, grimm, from Proto-Germanic *grimmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrem- (to resound, thunder, grumble, roar).

AdjectiveEdit

grim (comparative grimmer, superlative grimmest)

  1. dismal and gloomy, cold and forbidding
    Life was grim in many northern industrial towns.
    • 2019 August 30, Jonathan Watts, “Amazon fires show world heading for point of no return, says UN”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Cristiana Paşca Palmer, the executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, said the destruction of the world’s biggest rainforest was a grim reminder that a fresh approach needed to stabilise the climate and prevent ecosystems from declining to a point of no return, with dire consequences for humanity.
  2. rigid and unrelenting
    His grim determination enabled him to win.
  3. ghastly or sinister
    A grim castle overshadowed the village.
    • 2012 March 22, Scott Tobias, “The Hunger Games”, in AV Club:
      In movie terms, it suggests Paul Verhoeven in Robocop/Starship Troopers mode, an R-rated bloodbath where the grim spectacle of children murdering each other on television is bread-and-circuses for the age of reality TV, enforced by a totalitarian regime to keep the masses at bay.
  4. (Britain, slang) disgusting; gross
    - Wanna see the dead rat I found in my fridge?
    - Mate, that is grim!
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

grim (third-person singular simple present grims, present participle grimming, simple past and past participle grimmed)

  1. (transitive, rare) To make grim; to give a stern or forbidding aspect to.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English grim, grym, greme, from Old English *grimu, *grimmu, from Proto-Germanic *grimmį̄ (anger, wrath), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrem- (to resound, thunder, grumble, roar). Cognate with Middle Dutch grimme, German Grimme (anger).

NounEdit

grim (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Anger, wrath.
Derived termsEdit

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse grimmr, from Proto-Germanic *grimmaz.

AdjectiveEdit

grim

  1. ugly, unsightly
  2. nasty

InflectionEdit

Inflection of grim
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular grim grimmere grimmest2
Neuter singular grimt grimmere grimmest2
Plural grimme grimmere grimmest2
Definite attributive1 grimme grimmere grimmeste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

KalashaEdit

VerbEdit

grim

  1. taking

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *grimmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrem- (to thunder). Cognate with Old Saxon grim, Old High German grim (German grimm, grimmig), Old Norse grimmr (Danish grim, Swedish grym); and with Greek χρεμίζω (chremízo), Old Church Slavonic грьмѣти (grĭměti) (Russian греме́ть (gremétʹ)), Latvian gremt. Perhaps related in Old Norse to veiled or hooded, Grim is also an alternate name for Odin, who often went around disguised; compare the hooded appearance of The Grim Reaper.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

grim

  1. fierce, severe, terrible

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit