Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gjóta

VerbEdit

gyte (imperative gyt, present tense gyter, passive gytes, simple past gjøt or gytte, past participle gytt, present participle gytende)

  1. (of fish) to spawn

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gjóta

VerbEdit

gyte (present tense gyter or gyt, past tense gytte or gaut, past participle gytt or gote, passive infinitive gytast, present participle gytande, imperative gyt)

  1. (of fish) to spawn

ReferencesEdit


ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown. Also found in Northern English dialects. In the "boy" sense, possibly from get (offspring).

AdjectiveEdit

gyte

  1. crazy or mad; delirious; out of one's senses
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  2. foolish; demented

NounEdit

gyte (plural gytes)

  1. A madman; fool
  2. A first-year boy at The Royal High School, Edinburgh or Edinburgh Academy.

ReferencesEdit

  • Chamber's Twentieth Century Dictionary 1952