See also: Gote, göte, gotë, and Göte

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English gote (a drain), from Old English *gote (drain, gutter), from Proto-West Germanic [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *gutō (gutter), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰewd- (to pour). Cognate with Dutch goot (a gutter, drain, gully), German Gosse (a gutter). Related to Old English gutt (gut, entrails), Old English ġēotan (to pour, pour forth, shed, gush, flow, flood, overwhelm, found, cast). More at gut, yote.

NounEdit

gote (plural gotes)

  1. A drain; sluice; ditch or gutter.
  2. (Britain dialectal) A drainage pipe.
  3. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A deep miry place.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

VerbEdit

gote

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of gieten

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gutta.

NounEdit

gote f (plural gutis)

  1. drop

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

gote f

  1. plural of gota

AdjectiveEdit

gote

  1. feminine plural of goto

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English gāt, from Proto-Germanic *gaits, from a substrate language.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gote (plural gotes or gete)

  1. goat (especially a female)
  2. The meat or flesh of goats
  3. A chamois or antelope
  4. A lustful individual; lust as a concept
  5. (astrology) Capricorn

DescendantsEdit

  • English: goat
    • Abenaki: kots (from "goats")
    • Rotokas: goti
  • Scots: gait, gayt

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gutta.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gote f (oblique plural gotes, nominative singular gote, nominative plural gotes)

  1. drop (of liquid)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit