halse

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hals, from Old English heals ‎(neck, prow of a ship), from Proto-Germanic *halsaz ‎(neck), from Proto-Indo-European *kols-, *ḱols- ‎(neck). Cognate with Dutch hals ‎(neck, throat), German Hals ‎(neck, throat), Swedish hals ‎(neck, throat), Latin collum ‎(neck).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

halse ‎(plural halses)

  1. (anatomy, archaic) The neck; the throat.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English halsen, halchen, from Old English *halsian, *healsian ‎(to embrace, literally to fall upon the neck of), from heals ‎(neck). See above. Cognate with Old Saxon helsjen ‎(to embrace), Old High German halsōn (German halsen ‎(to jibe)), Icelandic hálsa ‎(to embrace).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

halse ‎(third-person singular simple present halses, present participle halsing, simple past and past participle halsed)

  1. (obsolete) To fall upon the neck of; embrace.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book VIII, chapter xxj:
      soo the Kyng took a lytel hackney and but fewe felauship with him vntyl he came vnto sir Tristrams pauelione / and whanne syre Trystram sawe the Kynge / he ranne vnto hym and wold haue holden his styrope / But the kynge lepte from his hors lyghtly / and eyther halsed other in armes

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English halsen, halsien ‎(to beseech, adjure), from Old English healsian, hālsian ‎(to entreat earnestly, beseech, implore), from Proto-Germanic *hailisōną ‎(to greet), from Proto-Indo-European *kailo-, *kailu- ‎(whole, safe). Cognate with Middle High German heilsen ‎(to predict), Swedish hälsa ‎(to greet), Icelandic heilsa ‎(to salute). More at whole, hailse.

VerbEdit

halse ‎(third-person singular simple present halses, present participle halsing, simple past and past participle halsed)

  1. (transitive) To greet; salute; hail.
  2. (transitive) To beseech; adjure.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English hals ‎(neck), from Old Norse háls ‎(neck, part of the forecastle or bow of a ship), from Proto-Germanic *halsaz ‎(neck). See Etymology 1. Cognate with Danish hals ‎(neck, tack).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

halse ‎(plural halses)

  1. Alternative form of hawse

VerbEdit

halse ‎(third-person singular simple present halses, present participle halsing, simple past and past participle halsed)

  1. (obsolete) To haul; to hoist.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

halse c

  1. plural indefinite of hals

VerbEdit

halse ‎(imperative hals, infinitive at halse, present tense halser, past tense halsede, past participle har halset)

  1. bark
    Hunden halser: The dog is barking
  2. rush
    halse efter: rush after

SynonymsEdit

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