See also: Hose, hōse, and hőse

EnglishEdit

 
A US naval officer using a fire hose
 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hose (leggings, hose), from Old English hose, hosa (hose, leggings), from Proto-West Germanic *hosā, from Proto-Germanic *husǭ (coverings, leggings, trousers), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kew- (to cover).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hose (countable and uncountable, plural hoses or hosen)

  1. (countable) A flexible tube conveying water or other fluid.
  2. (uncountable) A stocking-like garment worn on the legs; pantyhose, women's tights.
  3. (obsolete) Close-fitting trousers or breeches, reaching to the knee.

Usage notesEdit

  • (garment covering legs) Formerly a male garment covering the lower body, with the upper body covered by a doublet. By the 16th century hose had separated into two garments, stocken and breeches. Since the 1920s, hose refers mostly to women's stockings or pantyhose

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

hose (third-person singular simple present hoses, present participle hosing, simple past and past participle hosed)

  1. (transitive) To water or spray with a hose.
    • 1995, Vivian Russell, Monet's Garden: Through the Seasons at Giverny[1], →ISBN, page 83:
      Only days before the garden opens, the concrete is hosed down with a high-pressure jet and scrubbed.
  2. (transitive) To deliver using a hose.
    • 2003, Tony Hillerman, The Sinister Pig, →ISBN, page 57:
      He had just finished hosing gasoline into his tank, a short man, burly, needing a shave, and wearing greasy coveralls.
  3. (transitive) To provide with hose (garment)
    • 1834 July to December, Pierce Pungent, “Men and Manners”, in Fraser's magazine for town and country[2], volume X, page 416:
      The mighty mass of many a mingled race,
      Who dwell in towns where he pursued the chase;
      The men degenerate shirted, cloaked, and hosed-
      Nose and eyes only to the day exposed
  4. (transitive) To attack and kill somebody, usually using a firearm.
    • 2003, John R. Bruning, Jungle ace[3], Brassey's, →ISBN, page 136:
      His guns hosed down the vessel's decks, sweeping them clear of sailors, blowing holes in the bulkheads, and smashing gun positions.
  5. (transitive) To trick or deceive.
    • 1995, Keath Fraser, Popular anatomy[4], The Porcupine's Quill, →ISBN, page 458:
      Bartlett elaborated on what had happened at the warehouse, saying he thought Chandar was supposed to have advised, not hosed him.
  6. (transitive, computing) To break a computer so everything needs to be reinstalled; to wipe all files.
    • 2006 Spring, Joel Durham Jr., “Pimp Out Win XP with TweakUI”, in Maximum PC[5], Future US, Inc., ISSN 1522-4279, page 63:
      There aren't any tricky hexadecimal calculations to snare your brain, nor is there a need to worry about hosing the registry for all eternity.
  7. (transitive, sports) To cause an unfair disadvantage to a player or team through poor officiating; especially, to cause a player or team to lose the game with an incorrect call.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English hose, hosa, hosu, from Proto-West Germanic *hosā. Compare German Hose.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hose (plural hosen or hose or (rare) hoses)

  1. Stockings or tights (often worn by men in the ME period).
  2. (in the plural) pants, trousers; hose.
  3. Armour or protection for the legs; armoured legwear.
  4. (rare) The bendable outer casing of grains.
  5. (rare) A bendable tube for liquids; a hose.
  6. (rare) A bendable tube acting as a trap.
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: hose
  • Scots: hose, hoe
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From hose (noun).

VerbEdit

hose

  1. Alternative form of hosen

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English hās, *hārs.

AdjectiveEdit

hose

  1. Alternative form of hos (hoarse)
  2. inflection of hos (hoarse):
    1. weak singular
    2. strong/weak plural

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *hosā.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈxo.se/, [ˈho.ze]

NounEdit

hose f

  1. pant leg, stocking
  2. (in the plural) pants, trousers; hose

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit