See also: húg

EnglishEdit

 hug on Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From earlier hugge (to embrace, clasp with the arms) (1560), probably representing a conflation of huck (to crouch, huddle down) and Old Norse hugga (to comfort, console), from hugr (mind, heart, thought), from Proto-Germanic *hugiz (mind, thought, sense), cognate with Icelandic hugga (to comfort), Old English hyġe (thought, mind, heart, disposition, intention, courage, pride).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: hŭg, IPA(key): /hʌɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌɡ

NounEdit

hug (plural hugs)

  1. A close embrace, especially when charged with such an emotion as represented by: affection, joy, relief, lust, anger, agression, compassion, and the like, as opposed to being characterized by formality, equivocation or ambivalence (a half-embrace or "little hug").
  2. A particular grip in wrestling.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

hug (third-person singular simple present hugs, present participle hugging, simple past and past participle hugged)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To crouch; huddle as with cold.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Palsgrave to this entry?)
  2. (intransitive) To cling closely together.
  3. (transitive) To embrace by holding closely, especially in the arms.
    Billy hugged Danny until he felt better.
  4. (transitive) To stay close to (the shore etc.)
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 8, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      We toted in the wood and got the fire going nice and comfortable. Lord James still set in one of the chairs and Applegate had cabbaged the other and was hugging the stove.
    • 2020 October 21, Dr Joseph Brennan, “From the main line and over the waves”, in Rail, page 60:
      Gourock also boasted a pier railway, although its pier hugged the shore rather than jutting into the bay.
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To hold fast; to cling to; to cherish.
    • 1665, Joseph Glanvill, Scepsis Scientifica
      We hug intellectual deformities, if they bear our names

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hǫgg, verbal noun to hǫggva (to hew) (Danish hugge).

NounEdit

hug n (singular definite hugget, plural indefinite hug)

  1. stroke
  2. slash
  3. cut
InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hug (uninflected)

  1. squat

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hug

  1. imperative of hugge

FaroeseEdit

NounEdit

hug m

  1. indefinite accusative singular of hugur

ManxEdit

PrepositionEdit

hug

  1. to

InflectionEdit

Singular Plural
Person 1st 2nd 3rd m. 3rd f. 1st 2nd 3rd
Normal hym hood huggey huic hooin hiu huc
Emphatic hyms hoods huggeysyn huicish hooinyn hiuish hucsyn

VerbEdit

hug

  1. past tense of toyr

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hugr (thought), from Proto-Germanic *hugiz. Cognates include Norwegian Bokmål hu.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hug m (definite singular hugen, indefinite plural hugar, definite plural hugane)

  1. (chiefly uncountable) mind
  2. (chiefly uncountable, collective) one's thoughts
  3. (chiefly uncountable) wish, desire
    • 1971, Olav H. Hauge, "T'ao Ch'ien":
      Meir enn fyrr har han hug å draga seg attende til ein slik hageflekk.
      More than before, he has a desire to retreat to such a small garden.
  4. (uncountable, folklore) an itch in the nose which comes when someone is thinking of one, or as a warning that someone is about to arrive

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hug

  1. (predicative) keen, eager

ReferencesEdit