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EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /heɪl/, [heɪ̯ɫ]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophone: hale

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English haile, hail, from Old English hæġl, hæġel, from Proto-Germanic *haglaz (compare West Frisian heil, Low German Hagel, Dutch hagel, German Hagel, Danish hagl). Either from Proto-Indo-European *kagʰlos (pebble), or from *ḱoḱló-, a reduplication of *ḱel- (cold) (compare Old Norse héla (frost)).

Root-cognates outside of Germanic include Welsh caill (testicle), Breton kell (testicle), Lithuanian šešėlis (shade, shadow), Ancient Greek κάχληξ (kákhlēx, pebble), Albanian çakëll (pebble), Sanskrit शिशिर (śíśira, cool, cold).

NounEdit

hail (uncountable)

  1. Balls or pieces of ice falling as precipitation, often in connection with a thunderstorm.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

hail (third-person singular simple present hails, present participle hailing, simple past and past participle hailed)

  1. (impersonal) Said of the weather when hail is falling.
    They say it's going to hail tomorrow.
  2. (intransitive) To send or release hail.
    The cloud would hail down furiously within a few minutes.
  3. To pour down in rapid succession.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

The adjective hail is a variant of hale (health, safety) (from the early 13th century). The transitive verb with the meaning "to salute" is also from the 13th century. The cognate verb heal is already Old English (hǣlan), from Proto-Germanic *hailijaną (to make healthy, whole, to heal). Also cognate is whole, from Old English hāl (the spelling with wh- is unetymological, introduced in the 15th century).

VerbEdit

hail (third-person singular simple present hails, present participle hailing, simple past and past participle hailed)

  1. (transitive) to greet; give salutation to; salute.
  2. (transitive) To name; to designate; to call.
    • Milton
      And such a son as all men hailed me happy.
    He was hailed as a hero.
  3. (transitive) to call out loudly in order to gain the attention of
    Hail a taxi.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hail (comparative hailer, superlative hailest)

  1. (obsolete) Healthy, whole, safe.

InterjectionEdit

hail

  1. An exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or, occasionally, of familiar greeting.
    • Shakespeare
      Hail, brave friend.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hail

  1. h-prothesized form of ail

ScotsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English hāl (healthy, safe), from Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole, safe, sound), from Proto-Indo-European *kóh₂ilus (healthy, whole).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hail (comparative hailer, superlative hailest)

  1. whole
  2. free or recovered from disease, healthy, wholesome
  3. (of people, parts of the body, etc.) free from injury, safe, sound, unhurt
  4. (of material objects and of time, numbers etc.) whole, entire, complete, sound, unbroken, undamaged
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

hail (plural hails)

  1. the whole, the whole amount or number

VerbEdit

hail (third-person singular present hails, present participle hailin, past hailt, past participle hailt)

  1. to heal, cure

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hail (third-person singular present hails, present participle hailin, past hailt, past participle hailt)

  1. (sports) to drive the ball through the goal, etc.
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

hail (plural hails)

  1. (sports) goal, the shout when a goal is scored, the goal area

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English hæġl, hæġel, from Proto-Germanic *haglaz, either from Proto-Indo-European *kagʰlos (pebble), or from *ḱoḱló-, a reduplication of *ḱel- (cold).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hail (uncountable)

  1. (weather) hail, hailstones
  2. small shot, pellets
Derived termsEdit

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hail

  1. h-prothesized form of ail

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
ail unchanged unchanged hail
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse heill, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kóh₂ilus (healthy, whole). Akin to English whole.

Pronunciation 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

hail (neuter haillt)

  1. whole, complete, full, entire
    Dem sat å gamsä heilä ättermedagen
    They sat and chewed the fat the entire afternoon.

Pronunciation 2Edit

VerbEdit

hail (preterite haile, passive hailes)

  1. (transitive) to heal
SynonymsEdit